Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for tag: foot pain

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
November 25, 2019

It’s that time of year—after the turkey’s put away and the last slice of pumpkin pie is enjoyed, many of our patients at Connecticut Foot Care Centers will be hitting the stores in Hartford and Middlesex counties to scoop up Black Friday bargains. What’s the key to making it through the big day? The right shoes. Below are some recommendations.

Choose tried and true, not new. A full day of shopping is not the time to try out a new pair of shoes or boots. Forget fashion and go totally for function. The shoes you wear for shopping should be ones that have proven comfortable in the past. Athletic shoes or sneakers are usually best. Remember, as the day goes on your feet will swell. Shoes should have a roomy toe box and not feel tight when you first put them on. A blister can bring your shopping trip to a screeching halt in a hurry. Carry moleskin, just in case.

Be a lightweight. The heavier the shoe, the more quickly your feet will get tired and achy. That being said, you want a shoe that has a decently thick sole to provide shock absorption and cushioning.

Yes, you need your . Orthotics the positioning of your foot and help alleviate pain from conditions like bunions and plantar fasciitis. If our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. prescribed a custom , it’s especially important that you wear shoes for shopping that can accommodate it.

Don’t forget the foot powder. Lots of walking plus overheated cars and stores equals very sweaty feet. Keeping feet dry, especially when they are going to be closed up in shoes for many hours, is helpful in preventing athlete’s foot. Look for socks that draw moisture away from your skin and consider packing an extra pair—it will also reduce the chances of blisters forming.

Take injury precautions. It goes without saying that high heels are not the right choice for a day of shopping. If you have chronic weak ankles, you may want to go with a high top sneaker for extra ankle stability. Be sure there’s a good tread on the bottom of your shoe to avoid slips on wet floors and in parking garages.

If your shopping day leaves you with foot pain that doesn’t abate after a reasonable amount of time, don’t hesitate to contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
November 21, 2019
Category: Toe conditions

It’s amazing how the tiny edge of a nail can cause such extreme pain as in the case of an ingrown toenail. At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we find that patients are often reluctant to come one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices to get relief from an ingrown nail because they are afraid of how much it will hurt. In nearly every instance, patients in far less pain than when they arrived after one of our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. the nail.

Below are some tips to help prevent and relieve ingrown toenails.

 

Do: trim nails properly. This is the number one cause of ingrown toenails. Cut the nails short but not so short that the skin can overlap the nail, encouraging an ingrown nail to form.

Don’t: file toenails with rounded edges. Always file straight across.

Don’t: wear shoes and socks that too tight. When toes are pressed up against each other for long periods of time, ingrown nails are more likely to develop. High heels that force the foot forward also cramp toes together and can increase the risk for this condition.

the affected toe in warm water several times a day and try to gently massage the nail out of the skin.

Don’t: attempt “bathroom surgery” and try to dig the nail out with a sharp instrument. This most often leads to injury and infection. “Folk remedies” such as sticking a piece of cotton under the nail or cutting a notch out of the side of the nail are also bad ideas.

treatment promptly if soaking does not remove the ingrown nail. Delaying in going to the podiatrist will allow the nail to actually puncture the skin and possibly cause an infection.

Do: contact us if the nail is red, warm to the touch, oozing pus and/or if you have a fever, as these are signs that an infection is present and medical attention is needed immediately.

 

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
October 17, 2019
Category: ankle pain
Tags: foot pain   Ankle Pain   ankle swollen  

At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we know that swollen ankles can be uncomfortable and even painful. Thanks to gravity, your ankles and feet are prime areas for excess fluid in your body to collect. The reasons behind the swelling--known as edema in the medical world—can range from something minor to a major medical concern. Below are seven possible causes of swelling in your ankles.

  1. It’s the beginning of arthritis. Not just a single disease, arthritis is an umbrella term that covers over 100 conditions that can negatively affect the health of your joints. Joint inflammation can result in swelling. You may also feel pain and experience redness and heat around the joint.
  2. You’re not moving—simply standing or sitting in one place for too long can cause ankles to swell.
  3. You’ve put on a few extra pounds. Being overweight can put extra stress on your joints and trigger fluid retention. In severely overweight or obese people, extra fat cells contain excess hormones which can also cause your body to retain water.
  4. You have high blood pressure or heart disease. Swelling in your ankles (and your feet and legs) can be a sign that your heart is not pumping properly.
  5. You’ve got a bacterial infection. Although it’s possible to have an infection develop from a wound in or near your ankle joint, any bacteria that enters your bloodstream can end up causing an infection in any of your joints. Telltale signs of infection include heat and redness around the joint and also a fever.
  6. It’s your medication. There are several medicines, both prescription and over the counter that can cause fluid retention and swollen ankles. These include certain blood pressure medications, some antidepressants, hormones and anti-inflammatory steroids. Even NSAIDs such as ibuprofen can cause ankles to blow up.
  7. Your veins aren’t working the way they should. Over time, veins can stretch out and valves in them can start to leak, resulting in blood pooling your ankles and feet. This is more likely to happen if you are over the age of 50 and female.

Ongoing swelling of your ankles or swelling that gets worse suddenly or is accompanied by other serious symptoms like fever, shortness of breath or feeling lightheaded requires immediate medical attention. Contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices and our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. will perform a complete podiatric examination to determine the cause of your ankle swelling and the correct treatment.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
September 17, 2019

At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we’re starting to see a predictable increase in appointments for younger patients experiencing fall sports injuries. Many pediatric problems in young athletes can be avoided. Below are some common sports injuries and how to prevent them.

Plantar Fascitis—a long band of tissue known as the plantar fascia runs along the bottom of the foot. When the plantar fascia becomes aggravated and inflamed, your child can experience pain in the arch of the foot and also heel pain. This tends to be a recurring problem. In many cases, plantar fasciitis is related to a defect in foot structure. If your child has overly high arches or flat feet, he or she may need special footwear or a custom orthotic device to play sports comfortably.

Shin Splints—pain and swelling in the front of the lower part of the legs are the characteristic symptoms of this source of discomfort. Shin splints are often the result of repetitive activities like running. Changing training regimens stretches for the calves and properly supportive sports shoes can all help alleviate and prevent this condition.

Sever’s Disease—this condition specifically affects children in the age range of 8 to about 15. Until the heel bone is fully developed, new growth is constantly occurring, leaving a vulnerable area in the growth plate at the back of the heel. Overly-strenuous practices and sports that feature repeated pounding of the heel on hard surfaces, such as basketball, track, and soccer, can increase the risk for Sever’s Disease. In addition to rest periods, other ways to reduce irritation include: maintaining an appropriate weight, stretching exercises and correct footwear or support if your child has flat feet or high arches.

Achilles tendonitis—inflammation of this long tendon in the back of the leg that connects the calf muscle to the heel is most often the result of doing too much too quickly. It’s important that children and teen's condition themselves before the sports season and that coaches follow a training regimen that gradually increases the intensity and duration of physical activity.

If your child experiences pain or discomfort in their feet and ankles during or after sports, make an appointment at one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices as soon as possible. Our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. Will find the source of your child’s pediatric pain and prescribe the correct treatment to help them safely and comfortably enjoy their fall sport.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
September 03, 2019
Category: Foot Care

In September we celebrate Falls Prevention Awareness Day, and at Connecticut Foot Care Centers we want to join in encouraging our senior patients and those who love them to take the necessary steps to stay safe. Did you know that falls are the leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries to older adults? There’s much you can do to prevent falls. Here are 6 suggestions:

  1. Get foot pain evaluated promptly. If your feet hurt, it alters the way you walk and this, in turn, can cause a fall. Make an appointment at one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices so that our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. can determine the source of your foot pain and prescribe the correct treatment to alleviate it.
  2. Inspect your shoes periodically. Shoes that are stretched out, have worn down heels, loose stitching or tears in the uppers can trip you up. Be sure to get your foot measured professionally when buying new shoes because shoe size can increase with age, and wearing the wrong size will create discomfort.
  3. Cross-check your medications. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist and make sure you are not taking medications that interact with one another to cause you to feel dizzy or lightheaded.
  4. Get your eyes examined. If your vision is failing, falls are obviously more likely. Stick to your checkup schedule and see the eye doctor in between visits if you feel that your vision has changed.
  5. Fall-proof your home. Add lighting to stairs inside and out and also in the path you walk to get to the bathroom at night. Remove loose throw rugs, stacks of magazines on the floor and low plants and furniture. Keep electrical and computer cords out of walkways in your home.
  6. Consider taking an exercise class that focuses on building better balance. Ask at your local senior center or contact the department of aging in your town for locations and times.

If you’d like to learn more ways to be proactive about your podiatric health as a senior, contact us.