Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for tag: foot pain

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
September 17, 2019

At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we’re starting to see a predictable increase in appointments for younger patients experiencing fall sports injuries. Many pediatric problems in young athletes can be avoided. Below are some common sports injuries and how to prevent them.

Plantar Fascitis—a long band of tissue known as the plantar fascia runs along the bottom of the foot. When the plantar fascia becomes aggravated and inflamed, your child can experience pain in the arch of the foot and also heel pain. This tends to be a recurring problem. In many cases, plantar fasciitis is related to a defect in foot structure. If your child has overly high arches or flat feet, he or she may need special footwear or a custom orthotic device to play sports comfortably.

Shin Splints—pain and swelling in the front of the lower part of the legs are the characteristic symptoms of this source of discomfort. Shin splints are often the result of repetitive activities like running. Changing training regimens stretches for the calves and properly supportive sports shoes can all help alleviate and prevent this condition.

Sever’s Disease—this condition specifically affects children in the age range of 8 to about 15. Until the heel bone is fully developed, new growth is constantly occurring, leaving a vulnerable area in the growth plate at the back of the heel. Overly-strenuous practices and sports that feature repeated pounding of the heel on hard surfaces, such as basketball, track, and soccer, can increase the risk for Sever’s Disease. In addition to rest periods, other ways to reduce irritation include: maintaining an appropriate weight, stretching exercises and correct footwear or support if your child has flat feet or high arches.

Achilles tendonitis—inflammation of this long tendon in the back of the leg that connects the calf muscle to the heel is most often the result of doing too much too quickly. It’s important that children and teen's condition themselves before the sports season and that coaches follow a training regimen that gradually increases the intensity and duration of physical activity.

If your child experiences pain or discomfort in their feet and ankles during or after sports, make an appointment at one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices as soon as possible. Our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. Will find the source of your child’s pediatric pain and prescribe the correct treatment to help them safely and comfortably enjoy their fall sport.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
September 03, 2019
Category: Foot Care

In September we celebrate Falls Prevention Awareness Day, and at Connecticut Foot Care Centers we want to join in encouraging our senior patients and those who love them to take the necessary steps to stay safe. Did you know that falls are the leading cause of both fatal and non-fatal injuries to older adults? There’s much you can do to prevent falls. Here are 6 suggestions:

  1. Get foot pain evaluated promptly. If your feet hurt, it alters the way you walk and this, in turn, can cause a fall. Make an appointment at one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices so that our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. can determine the source of your foot pain and prescribe the correct treatment to alleviate it.
  2. Inspect your shoes periodically. Shoes that are stretched out, have worn down heels, loose stitching or tears in the uppers can trip you up. Be sure to get your foot measured professionally when buying new shoes because shoe size can increase with age, and wearing the wrong size will create discomfort.
  3. Cross-check your medications. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist and make sure you are not taking medications that interact with one another to cause you to feel dizzy or lightheaded.
  4. Get your eyes examined. If your vision is failing, falls are obviously more likely. Stick to your checkup schedule and see the eye doctor in between visits if you feel that your vision has changed.
  5. Fall-proof your home. Add lighting to stairs inside and out and also in the path you walk to get to the bathroom at night. Remove loose throw rugs, stacks of magazines on the floor and low plants and furniture. Keep electrical and computer cords out of walkways in your home.
  6. Consider taking an exercise class that focuses on building better balance. Ask at your local senior center or contact the department of aging in your town for locations and times.

If you’d like to learn more ways to be proactive about your podiatric health as a senior, contact us.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
August 20, 2019
Category: ankle
Tags: foot pain   Ankle Pain   Surgery   podiatric tips  

If you have a toe, foot or ankle surgery coming up, we at Connecticut Foot Care Centers believe in the Boy Scout motto, “Be prepared.” There are many podiatric conditions where a surgical procedure may provide the best or the only relief to foot pain and disability. Some of the more common ones include:

If one of our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. has recommended a surgical solution for a foot problem, discussing the following areas will help you plan appropriately and be more confident about the surgery.

The Procedure—the foot doctor will explain the surgical procedure to you. If there is any part that you don’t understand, ask questions. Some things you’ll want to know include:

  • Will the surgery be done in one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices? Today, many podiatric surgeries can be done on an outpatient basis.
  • Is there any pre-op testing needed?
  • What type of anesthesia will be used?
  • How long will the procedure take, and will I need someone to drive me home when it is over?

Post-Op Care—a big question on most patients’ minds is how much pain will I be in after the surgery? The podiatrist can address this with you as well as what pain management options will be available. You’ll also want to know if the foot that’s been operated on will be immobilized and if you will need assistive devices such as crutches, a motor scooter or surgical shoes.

Recovery—it’s important to have a realistic understanding of the recovery period from your surgery. How long will it be before you can bear weight on the affected foot? Drive? Resume work and regular activities? This will help you arrange for enough time off from work and enlist any help you might need from family and friends.

Follow Up—even after you’re able to return to work and normal activities, there may be physical therapy or other additional treatment necessary to complete the rehabilitation of your foot.

We want to ease any fears or anxiety that you may be feeling if you have an upcoming surgery. If you have unanswered questions, don’t hesitate to contact us for answers.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
May 21, 2019
Category: Proper Foot Care
Tags: foot care   foot pain   senior feet   foot exams  

May is Older Americans Month, and at Connecticut Foot Care Centers that gives us the perfect opportunity to celebrate our senior patients. It’s a myth that getting older automatically means foot pain and problems. Many conditions that affect the feet of seniors, including diseases such as arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes as well as common foot and ankle problems can be prevented with proper care. Below are six simple ways to protect your feet as you age.

  1. Don’t ignore foot pain. At any age, foot pain is not “normal.” The best outcomes for podiatric disorders occur when problems are diagnosed and treated promptly. If you experience pain or discomfort, contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices for an appointment.
  2. Boost your calcium intake. The bones in your feet carry your entire body. To stay strong, they need ample amounts of this mineral. Obvious sources are dairy products, but if you are lactose intolerant, turn to leafy greens, seeds, canned fish like sardines and salmon, fortified breads, juices and cereals or supplements to meet your daily requirement.
  3. Keep moving. Exercise has many benefits to your feet. It helps maintain range of motion and flexibility as well as aiding you in maintaining an appropriate weight.
  4. Practice self-exams. Get in the habit of regularly inspecting your feet or ask a family member or caregiver to do it for you. Look for growths, lumps, changes in toenails, rashes, bruising or swelling and let our podiatrists, Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. know if you find anything concerning.
  5. Fall-proof your home. Do a walk through with a family member or friend and evaluate areas that could increase the risk of falls and fractures. Some things to check include: loose carpets or throw rugs, clutter or electrical cords on the floor, poor lighting in stairwells and hallways, bathrooms that need grab bars or no stick surfaces in tubs, railings on both sides of the stairs.
  6. Get your feet measured. Shoe size can change when you get older. Buy shoes that are sturdy with non-slip soles and roomy toe boxes.

Helping you care for your feet so you can continue to live the active life you love is our goal. If you have questions about foot health care, contact us today.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
April 22, 2019
Category: Foot Conditions

A condition that we treat frequently at Connecticut Foot Care Centers is bunions. We find that most patients are able to easily identify a bunion by its telltale bump on the side of the big toe, but often don’t know much more about this disorder. Below are some facts to help you better understand bunions and what to do about them:

FACT: A bunion is a deformity in the bone which occurs as a result of an enlargement of the joint at the base of the big toe. The toe moving out of place and moving towards the second toe is what produces the bony protrusion on the side of the toe. In some cases, the toe will even overlap the third toe or rotate and twist. Bunions can lead to additional deformities as well, such as hammertoe.

FACT: Unfortunately, by the time a bunion is visibly obvious, it has progressed to a more severe state. The best time to evaluate and treat a bunion is in its earliest stages. If you notice even a slight appearance of your toe beginning to look crooked or out of place, or if you start to feel pain or numbness in the toe, that’s the time to contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices. Our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. will quickly examine your toe and diagnose the source of your discomfort.

FACT: There several conservative treatments available for bunion sufferers, including:

  • Modifying footwear and choosing styles with low heels and roomy toe boxes
  • Custom orthotic devices to help correct the position of the foot and stabilize the joint
  • Exercises and physical therapy to maintain range of motion and joint flexibility
  • Night splints to realign the toe and joint
  • Padding, if friction and pressure are causing pain to the toe

FACT: Although bunions are not inherited, the biomechanical defect that predisposes a patient to develop a bunion can be passed on. One of the best ways to prevent bunions is to limit time spent in footwear with high heels and narrow pointy toe boxes. Other conditions such as flat feet and neuromuscular problems can also lead to bunions. Taking care of your feet and not ignoring the pain and other symptoms can also lower your risk of bunions.

If you are currently experiencing foot pain or discomfort, don’t wait. Contact us today for an appointment.