Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for tag: foot care

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
June 18, 2019
Category: Foot Care

At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC we are celebrating men this month and encouraging our male patients and those who love them to take the best care possible of their feet. It’s a fact, according to several studies men often need a little push when it comes to their health. We want to help male patients recognize the importance of being proactive about podiatric care and the fact that it doesn’t have to be difficult or time-consuming. Below are some suggestions for our male patients (and the females who care about them).

  • Don’t ignore foot pain. Of course, you’re busy and have lots of other things to do when you’re not working besides visiting the foot doctor for that annoying pain in your foot or ankle. But, putting off seeking treatment can actually put you on the disabled list for an extended period of time. Continuing to walk on a foot that hurts is likely to increase damage and the need for longer and more invasive treatment. If you are in pain, contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices. Our podiatrists, Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. will examine your feet and ankles, track down the cause of your discomfort and prescribe the correct treatment to get you back on track pain-free.
  • Throw out worn out shoes. Shoe shopping may not be your most favorite past time but continuing to wear shoes that are stretched out or have lost their arch support is just asking for foot pain and disorders like ankle sprains and plantar fasciitis. Visit a reputable footwear store and while you’re there, get your foot professionally measured—shoe size can change with time. Most people have one foot that is larger than the other. Always buy to accommodate the larger foot and take the time to try on both shoes and walk around for several minutes to ensure that shoes fit comfortably.
  • Develop good foot care habits. Wash feet daily and check them over to make sure there are no changes in skin or toenails, lumps or growths, bruises, swelling or other unusual symptoms that could signal the beginning of a foot problem.
  • Make good lifestyle choices. Regular exercise, a healthy diet, not smoking and limiting the amount of alcohol you consume will all help you maintain good overall health. This, in turn, will help prevent diseases like diabetes, peripheral arterial disease, and arthritis that could cause foot damage.

If you have questions about men’s foot health issues, contact us today.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
June 11, 2019

Your podiatrist deals with a wide range of lower extremity conditions and disorders. At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we want to encourage patients to contact us if they have a concern about their feet. No symptom is too trivial. In fact, sometimes unusual changes in your feet, even if they are not painful, can signal the beginning of a serious condition. In some cases, your feet may be the place where other diseases that affect your entire body may first show up, including diabetes, arthritis, and circulatory or nerve issues.

Below are 6 reasons to contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices.

 

  1. Any pain in your feet or ankles that is persistent.
  2. Severe cracking, peeling or scaling on the heel or foot.
  3. Unusual rashes, blisters or bruising.
  4. Changes in toenails including discoloration, thickening of the nails, crumbling at the edges.
  5. Tingling or burning sensation or loss of feeling in your feet.
  6. Any signs of bacterial infection, such as redness, tenderness, heat with red streaks extending from the affected area, or any sign of discharge or pus. If these are accompanied by a fever, it is essential that you contact us immediately.

Diabetic Patients

 

If you have diabetes, you have special risks associated with infections and difficulty healing. For this reason, you should call us even for minor podiatric conditions such as athlete’s foot, blisters or toenail trouble. Get in the habit of checking your feet daily or have someone do for you if you cannot easily see your entire foot. This will help you spot potentially dangerous changes early.

Whatever your symptoms, our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. will perform a complete podiatric exam, get your medical history and order any tests necessary to diagnose your discomfort and determine the treatment plan to manage it.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
June 04, 2019
Category: diabetic foot care

At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC we encourage all of our patients to be proactive in the health of their feet. Patients with diabetes, however, have to be even more diligent in the care of their feet. Diabetes delivers a double whammy when it comes to podiatric health. First, many patients with this disease experience problems with circulation. This means injuries and infections can be very difficult to heal. Second, neuropathy or lack of sensation in the feet is also common in diabetic patients, making it challenging to detect injuries and symptoms of disorders promptly. 

Below are some recommendations for foot care for diabetic patients:

  • Get in the habit of inspecting your feet regularly, or ask someone else to do for you if you cannot easily see your entire foot. Look for changes in shape, size, skin color, toenail condition, bruises, cuts, rashes, lumps or swelling. Report anything unusual to our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. promptly.
  • Take special care when choosing your footwear. Be sure shoes have a roomy toe box and are made of soft, flexible material. Keep heels lower than two inches. Periodically run your hand around the inside of your shoes to check for loose stitching or rough spots that may rub on your skin.
  • Keep feet dry. Always towel dry your feet completely after washing, especially between your toes. That’s where athlete’s foot often starts. If you sweat excessively, use an anti-fungal powder each morning. Change your socks during the day if you notice they are damp. This will greatly reduce the risk of fungal infections.
  • Avoid going barefoot. This will help prevent cuts and puncture wounds. It will also lessen the chances of getting a foot infection or warts, as these are spread by direct contact.
  • Do not attempt to remove corns or calluses on your own. This can lead to an injury that could become infected. If you need help properly trimming your nails, ask the podiatrist.

Even seemingly minor foot problems can become major threats to your health if you have diabetes. Take the proper precautions to prevent foot and ankle issues. If you have questions about how to care for your diabetic feet, contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
May 21, 2019
Category: Proper Foot Care
Tags: foot care   foot pain   senior feet   foot exams  

May is Older Americans Month, and at Connecticut Foot Care Centers that gives us the perfect opportunity to celebrate our senior patients. It’s a myth that getting older automatically means foot pain and problems. Many conditions that affect the feet of seniors, including diseases such as arthritis, osteoporosis, diabetes as well as common foot and ankle problems can be prevented with proper care. Below are six simple ways to protect your feet as you age.

  1. Don’t ignore foot pain. At any age, foot pain is not “normal.” The best outcomes for podiatric disorders occur when problems are diagnosed and treated promptly. If you experience pain or discomfort, contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices for an appointment.
  2. Boost your calcium intake. The bones in your feet carry your entire body. To stay strong, they need ample amounts of this mineral. Obvious sources are dairy products, but if you are lactose intolerant, turn to leafy greens, seeds, canned fish like sardines and salmon, fortified breads, juices and cereals or supplements to meet your daily requirement.
  3. Keep moving. Exercise has many benefits to your feet. It helps maintain range of motion and flexibility as well as aiding you in maintaining an appropriate weight.
  4. Practice self-exams. Get in the habit of regularly inspecting your feet or ask a family member or caregiver to do it for you. Look for growths, lumps, changes in toenails, rashes, bruising or swelling and let our podiatrists, Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. know if you find anything concerning.
  5. Fall-proof your home. Do a walk through with a family member or friend and evaluate areas that could increase the risk of falls and fractures. Some things to check include: loose carpets or throw rugs, clutter or electrical cords on the floor, poor lighting in stairwells and hallways, bathrooms that need grab bars or no stick surfaces in tubs, railings on both sides of the stairs.
  6. Get your feet measured. Shoe size can change when you get older. Buy shoes that are sturdy with non-slip soles and roomy toe boxes.

Helping you care for your feet so you can continue to live the active life you love is our goal. If you have questions about foot health care, contact us today.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
February 11, 2019
Category: Foot Care
Tags: foot care   podiatrist   foot pain   Ankle Pain  

This winter has been an odd one for all of us in New England. Though our winter started off easy enough, the more recent blasts of icy air from the returning polar vortex have posed some difficulty for many of us! When the temps drop so low into the single digits or below, it’s hard to resist the urge to hibernate. This is especially true for those of us with foot or ankle conditions that seem to feel worse in cold weather or become more painful the less we keep moving on a regular basis. There are simple and easy ways to take care of yourself at home while paying attention to when and where your foot or ankles hurt.

It’s important to start out by considering whether or not your foot or ankle pain ever resolves with rest, or if it’s gone unaddressed by a podiatrist for longer than a few weeks. One out of every three people experience foot or ankle pain, yet only half of those experiencing pain seek help from a podiatrist. Dr. Jeffrey S. Kahn, Dr. Craig M. Kaufman, Dr. Ayman M. Latif, and Dr. Raffaella R. Pascarella encourage you to advocate for the health of your feet and ankles. If you’ve already addressed your foot issues with a foot doctor, the next step is to figure out what works and feels best for you to stay active.

What does ‘being active’ mean to you? When it comes to foot and ankle health, we don’t mean that you have to run triathlons on a monthly basis to be considered active. It’s hard to be active when it can be difficult enough to identify when, where, and why your feet or ankles hurt. Connecticut Foot Care Specialists want to offer a few easy ways to keep your feet moving and stay aware of what hurts:

  •          Sit in a chair and stretch your legs forward.
  •          Roll your ankles around clockwise, then counter-clockwise.
  •          Point your foot up and down, left to right, and in a circle.
  •          Repeat this, but while your toes are curled.
  •          Place your feet on the ground and point down to be on your toes.

During these exercises, pay attention to where it hurts and when. Write it down and share with our doctors at your consultation to get a step ahead of the game when dealing with your foot pain. Contact us today to schedule your appointment!