Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for tag: foot care

By Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC
February 17, 2020
Category: Foot Conditions

Every February, the American Heart Association sponsors American Heart Month. What’s heart health got to do with your feet? At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we’re glad you asked! Keeping your arteries clear of plaque and cholesterol is an important part of keeping your heart healthy. It’s also essential for maintaining good circulation—something your legs and feet depend on. Poor circulation can result in neuropathy or nerve damage, which can cause a loss of sensation in your feet. It can make it difficult to detect cuts, infections, and injuries. Decreased blood flow also results in less oxygenated blood getting to your feet and toes, which slows healing and can lead to wounds and ulcers. Fortunately, there is much you can do to prevent heart disease.

Here are the American Heart Association’s “Life’s Simple 7” risk factors you can control.

  1. Manage Blood Pressure—Having high blood pressure significantly increases your risk of heart attack and stroke. You can help lower your blood pressure by losing weight, exercising regularly, and finding ways to reduce stress.

  2. Control Cholesterol—Elevated cholesterol contributes to artery-clogging plaque, which can cause heart disease and stroke. Cholesterol is normally controlled by diet and medication.

  3. Reduce Blood Sugar—An important first step is learning what your blood sugar levels are. If you need to lower them, diet plays a huge role. Sugar is hidden in many foods—look for ingredients that end in “ose,” such as fructose. Keeping blood sugar levels where they should also reduce your risk of diabetes—a disease that can cause several problems for your feet.

  4. Get Active—Being physically active has many benefits for your heart (and the rest of your body). It helps your heart pump more efficiently, aids in weight reduction, and helps alleviate stress.

  5. Eat Better—One of the biggest weapons in fighting heart disease is your diet. Reducing the amounts of saturated and trans fats that you eat, controlling portion size, and making healthy swaps can reduce your risk for heart attacks and cardiovascular disease.

  6. Lose Weight—Carrying excess weight puts a strain on your heart, lungs, blood vessels, and your bones and joints. As you lose weight, you’ll feel better physically and feel better about yourself.

  7. Stop Smoking—People who smoke cigarettes are at the highest risk for heart disease.

Changes in your feet and legs such as skin discoloration, swelling, and toenail thickening can all be early signs of heart disease. If you experience any unusual symptoms in your feet, contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices.  We offer convenient early morning and late appointments to accommodate your busy schedule. Our podiatrists, Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. and Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. will examine your feet and determine if a problem is present and how to treat it.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
December 03, 2019
Category: Foot Conditions

At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we know that our greater Hartford and Middlesex County patients are making their holiday gift lists and beginning to search for the perfect gifts for family and friends. We want to remind you that it’s a great time of the year to thank your feet with a little something special. Below are some top suggestions for holiday gifts for your feet.

New Shoes—probably the best preventive measure you can take to keep your feet healthy is wearing shoes that are well designed and fit properly. Heel pain, flat feet, toe deformities like bunions and hammertoes and many other podiatric conditions are caused or made worse by poor shoe choice. Get your feet professionally measured. It’s estimated that up to 90% of people are wearing shoes that are too small for their feet.

A Good Moisturizer—overheated homes, offices and stores and dry air all contribute to dry skin in the winter. Applying a rich, emollient lotion or cream to your feet every night and covering them with a pair of soft socks will help prevent painful heel cracks and flaky skin.

Anti-Fatigue Mat—if you spend long hours standing and preparing meals in the kitchen and washing dishes after family meals, or you have a job that requires prolonged periods of standing, consider a cushiony, anti-fatigue mat. These mats prevent foot, knee and back pain, reduce strain on joints and improve circulation for healthier feet and ankles.

A Podiatric Checkup—too many patients put off getting uncomfortable foot or ankle symptoms evaluated, especially during the busy holiday season. The best present you can give your feet is to get foot pain checked promptly. Make an appointment at one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices so that our podiatrists, Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. can find the source of your discomfort and get you on the road to relief.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
November 25, 2019

It’s that time of year—after the turkey’s put away and the last slice of pumpkin pie is enjoyed, many of our patients at Connecticut Foot Care Centers will be hitting the stores in Hartford and Middlesex counties to scoop up Black Friday bargains. What’s the key to making it through the big day? The right shoes. Below are some recommendations.

Choose tried and true, not new. A full day of shopping is not the time to try out a new pair of shoes or boots. Forget fashion and go totally for function. The shoes you wear for shopping should be ones that have proven comfortable in the past. Athletic shoes or sneakers are usually best. Remember, as the day goes on your feet will swell. Shoes should have a roomy toe box and not feel tight when you first put them on. A blister can bring your shopping trip to a screeching halt in a hurry. Carry moleskin, just in case.

Be a lightweight. The heavier the shoe, the more quickly your feet will get tired and achy. That being said, you want a shoe that has a decently thick sole to provide shock absorption and cushioning.

Yes, you need your . Orthotics the positioning of your foot and help alleviate pain from conditions like bunions and plantar fasciitis. If our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. prescribed a custom , it’s especially important that you wear shoes for shopping that can accommodate it.

Don’t forget the foot powder. Lots of walking plus overheated cars and stores equals very sweaty feet. Keeping feet dry, especially when they are going to be closed up in shoes for many hours, is helpful in preventing athlete’s foot. Look for socks that draw moisture away from your skin and consider packing an extra pair—it will also reduce the chances of blisters forming.

Take injury precautions. It goes without saying that high heels are not the right choice for a day of shopping. If you have chronic weak ankles, you may want to go with a high top sneaker for extra ankle stability. Be sure there’s a good tread on the bottom of your shoe to avoid slips on wet floors and in parking garages.

If your shopping day leaves you with foot pain that doesn’t abate after a reasonable amount of time, don’t hesitate to contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
November 21, 2019
Category: Toe conditions

It’s amazing how the tiny edge of a nail can cause such extreme pain as in the case of an ingrown toenail. At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we find that patients are often reluctant to come one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices to get relief from an ingrown nail because they are afraid of how much it will hurt. In nearly every instance, patients in far less pain than when they arrived after one of our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. the nail.

Below are some tips to help prevent and relieve ingrown toenails.

 

Do: trim nails properly. This is the number one cause of ingrown toenails. Cut the nails short but not so short that the skin can overlap the nail, encouraging an ingrown nail to form.

Don’t: file toenails with rounded edges. Always file straight across.

Don’t: wear shoes and socks that too tight. When toes are pressed up against each other for long periods of time, ingrown nails are more likely to develop. High heels that force the foot forward also cramp toes together and can increase the risk for this condition.

the affected toe in warm water several times a day and try to gently massage the nail out of the skin.

Don’t: attempt “bathroom surgery” and try to dig the nail out with a sharp instrument. This most often leads to injury and infection. “Folk remedies” such as sticking a piece of cotton under the nail or cutting a notch out of the side of the nail are also bad ideas.

treatment promptly if soaking does not remove the ingrown nail. Delaying in going to the podiatrist will allow the nail to actually puncture the skin and possibly cause an infection.

Do: contact us if the nail is red, warm to the touch, oozing pus and/or if you have a fever, as these are signs that an infection is present and medical attention is needed immediately.

 

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
November 11, 2019
Category: Foot Care

At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we know that you’re a busy person! That’s why we want to make sure your appointment with our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. is as efficient and productive as possible.

Before You Go

Taking a few moments before your appointment to gather information and handle preliminary concerns will ensure that your visit goes smoothly and yields maximum help. We recommend the following:

  • Contact your insurance company prior to your appointment to find out if a referral is required.
  • If you have any special needs, called the office ahead of time and let us know.
  • Consider bringing someone with you to the appointment—a second set of ears can be helpful.
  • Write a list of all the concerns and questions you have regarding your podiatric condition. Check your list before your appointment ends and be sure all your questions have been answered.
  • Compile a list of all the medications—prescription and over-the-counter—that you take and give it to the foot doctor. Also, be prepared to let the podiatrist know if you have any allergies, are pregnant or attempting to become pregnant.
  • If your foot pain is related to a fitness or sports activity, bring the shoes you wear for the activity. Otherwise, wear a pair of shoes that you use frequently. The foot doctor may want to examine your shoes to check the wear pattern for additional insights about your condition.

Don’t Forget the Follow-up

If the podiatrist has asked you to come back to check on your condition, make the appointment before you leave the office. Schedule any required tests and ask when you can expect the results. If your condition worsens or you have any questions about your diagnosis or treatment after you leave the office, don’t hesitate to contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices.