Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

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It is that time year again when our feet come out from their winter shoe hiding place and are free in flip flops, sandals, and open toed shoes. You may look down at your naked toenails and think "This will not do!" 
But you may be concerned about going to a nail salon to get a pedicure because of the horror stories you have heard from friends, family, and co-workers. Most people know about the dangers dirty salons can cause: fungus, cuts, and mishaps. 
It is crucial therefore that you go to a salon that uses clean practices. You can assume that there is always a chance for exposure to these fungi, bacteria, viruses, and pathogens. We see the effects of a pedicure gone wrong all the time in our offices- from patients who have had toenail fungus for years, botched cuticle cutting, and various other viruses. 
Don't become another victim of a foot condition from the salon. Here are some things you should look for in a good nail salon:

  • Get to the salon 15 minutes early. It may be a pain in the neck to arrive 15 minutes early before your appointment, but the point is to give yourself time to check out the salon, even if you have been there before. Does the salon look professional and clean? Trash bins should never be overflowing, and neither should dust be collecting on shelves. 
  • Find licenses. Each of the nail technician's, along with the salon's license, should be posted near the entrance so everyone can see them. Don't see the licenses? Ask your technician.
  • How do they sanitize their tools? Tools should either be sterilized in an autoclave, a big device that sanitizes tools, or in liquid disinfectant. The solution should not be cloudy; if the solution is cloudy, it needs to be changed. Ask if they use test strips to make sure the disinfectant is working. 
  • Look at the pedicure area. Are the footbaths being cleaned after every pedicure? After every pedicure the footbaths should be disinfected with hot, soapy water, filled with water again, along with disinfectant. The spa should run at least 10 minutes before being emptied out again and wiped down. 
  • Check out the manicure area. Is your manicurist cleaning and disinfecting after every single client? new towels, cotton balls, disposable nail files, and wooden tools should all be replaced and thrown out.
  • Watch out if you are getting acrylic nails or fillings. The manicurist should wash her hands before getting started and apply an antibacterial gel or spray to yours. Every tool should be sterilized. 
  • Avoid cuticles. Cuticles should be pushed back but not cut. Your cuticles provide protection for your nail bed, so they should be kept. 
  • Bring your own manicure kit. Many nail salons will let you bring your own manicure kit, as well as your own polish. But- you need to make sure they are cleaned and sterilized after each visit. 
  • Visit a med spa. Still have doubts? Visit a med spa, where a physician is on staff and oversees the environment, tools, and equipment. 

Reference: Elle
If you believe you have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.
Connecticut Foot Care Centers
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Costa Rica's former president Oscar Arias Sanchez (1986-1990, 2006-2010) underwent surgery on his right foot last Sunday to repair a ruptured tendon. 

The surgery was performed at the Clinica Biblica, a private hospital in downtown San Jose, per instructions from Arias' personal physician. The former president and Noble Peace laureate said he has been suffering from recurring pain and discomfort for several weeks.

Arias' daughter, Silvia Aria, spoke with members of the media after the surgery, stating that the surgery began at 10:30 AM and lasted two hours.

Arias was accompanied to the hospital by his wife Suzanne Fischel and other relatives. The first medical report after surgery found Arias, 73, in good health.

Arias was president of Costa Rica twice and won the Noble Peace Prize in 2007 for his efforts to end and negotiate peace accords for years of civil wars in Central America. 

Reference: Tico Times

If you believe you have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

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Liam Hemsworth fans across the world are hoping for a speedy recovery for the popular Australian actor.

Hemsworth injured his right ankle while filming The Hunger Games: Mockingjay 2 in Berlin this weekend. Production stopped on Saturday and resumed last Wednesday. 

The actor was seen with his driver and two people from his entourage for a second-round check-up at the doctor's today, where he was for an hour and a half. Even though he was limping, Hemsworth was all smiles and was in good spirits. 

The rumor is that Hemsworth sustained the injury when he kicked a styrofoam stone dummy, but it has not been confirmed. 

Before getting injured, Hemsworth was showing off his dance moves at the Cannes Film Festival. The cast of Mockingjay 2 got dance fever at the 67th Festival, with Hemsworth the first to hit the dance floor. The crew boogied out to songs by Beyonce, Michael Jackson, and Macklemore and Ryan Lewis. 

References: E! Online and Perez Hilton

If you believe you have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.

Sinus tarsi is a syndrome specific to the sinus tarsi, also known as the eye of the foot, which is an opening outside the foot between the ankle and heel bone.

This syndrome was first described by Dr. Denis O'Connor in 1957. He created a surgical procedure, called the O'Connor procedure, that involves the removal of all or portions of the contents of the sinus tarsi.

Sinus tarsi syndrome can be caused by an inversion (rolling out) ankle sprain or a pinching or impingement of the soft tissues of the sinus tarsi due to an extremely pronated foot.

Patients typically complain of localized pain in the sinus tarsi region with a sense of instability and aggravation by weight bearing activity. These patients usually have a difficult time walking on grass, gravel, etc. A physical examination shows pain to palpation of the sinus tarsi with pain increasing on turning in or turning out. The foot and ankle joints may also be loose or instability.

Your podiatrist will examine the foot and order X-rays, a bone scan, CT scan, and/or MRI evaluation. However, this can be a difficult diagnosis to make, as other conditions and syndromes are often ruled out first.

Your podiatrist may recommend anti-inflammatories, stable shoes, periods of immobilization, ankle sleeves, and orthotics for decreasing the pain. Cases that are proving resistant to non-invasive treatment may require oral steroids, steroid injections, and physical therapy. Surgery is rarely necessary, but if unavoidable, open surgery through an incision or closed surgery via arthroscopy may be considered.

Sinus tarsi syndrome commonly happens after an ankle sprain or in someone who has a severely pronated foot. It is important to get a correct diagnosis so the root problem can be addressed

Reference: American Academy of Podiatric Sports Medicine

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.

In a new correlation study, those who have foot or ankle injuries are more likely to be deficient in vitamin D. This new relationship between vitamin D deficiency and the risk for foot and ankle injuries may help with dietary advice for seniors, athletes, and others with a propensity to have bone damage. 

Vitamin D has a dual purpose in our bodies: first to act as a nutrient and second to be a hormone. Traditionally it has been a main factor in helping to build and repair bone. Other research shows that vitamin D can reduce chronic conditions such as heart disease, cancers, multiple sclerosis, and infectious diseases. 

However, getting the amount of vitamin D you would need to promote your health is difficult. Dairy products and fatty fishes contain vitamin D, but most Americans do not consume enough of these to meet their daily intake requirements. Some foods now, like breakfast cereal, fortify their products with vitamin D. It is possible to get vitamin D through sun exposure, but one would have to sit outside every day for 15 minutes to receive the proper benefit. 

Those who do not receive enough vitamin D through their food intake will often be told by their physician to take a vitamin supplement. 

There is a debate going on among medical professionals as to how much vitamin D a person should acquire in a day. A 2010 study says that the USDA guidelines should be tripled to 600 IU per day. This is a level higher than what the average multivitamin contains, typically at 400 IU. It is unclear as to how much vitamin D is needed for optimum health.

The recent study published by Foot And Ankle International looked at the relationship between vitamin D and foot and ankle injuries. The study involved 75 people, all whom had suffered a foot or ankle injury. 47 patients had levels of vitamin D that would be considered insufficient (less than 03 ng/mL) and 13 percent were found to be vitamin D deficient. The study also found that those who had suffered a fracture had significantly less vitamin D than those who only sustained a sprain.

However, this was just a correlation study and there is no evidence to support the idea that vitamin D causes foot and ankle injuries or visa versa. Further studies would be needed with supporting evidence to prove this claim. 

Reference: Liberty Voice

If you believe you have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.