Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for tag: congenital foot deformity

Calcaneovalgus foot is also known as flexible flatfoot in infants and young children. In infants this foot disorder is seen with the foot abducted (turned) and the ankle severely dorsiflexied (twisted). Upon birth the foot looks like it is plastered against the front of the leg. A mild form of calcaneovalgus foot may be seen in 30% of infants, but the more severe form may be present in 1/1000 infants.

Calcaneovalgus foot is a common foot disorder which is a result of intra uterine positioning, and muscle imbalancing, which happens because of weakness of plantarflexors.

Calcaneus indicates that the heel is downward, and the ankle is flexed upward. Valgus refers to the heel turned outward. Calcaneovalgus feet are often called "packaging problems" because the structures were normally formed, but were deformed in the uterus because of crowding. It is commonly seen in first-born children and females.

Diagnosis is made by physical exam. The feet have a classic appearance with the feet bent upward, and the heel bone should be palpable to the heel pad in a twisted position. There should be good ankle motion, but may be limited by tight anterior structures. There should also be good flexibility in the hindfoot and forefoot. It is important to verify the flexibility of the foot and ankle.

Treatment can often be very simple. Gentle stretching and massage will help mobility and appearance. Within one to two months, the feet will have improved. In serious cases casting, followed by stretching exercises and an AFO splint for additional months may be necessary.

Most infants have a full recovery with recommended treatment. Rarely there is an external rotation alignment issue to the legs as the child begins to walk, but this typically corrects itself over time.

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.

Trevor's Disease is an extremely rare congenital bone developmental disorder that occurs in one case per million. It is three times more common in males than females.

This disease is characterized by an asymmetrical limb deformity due to localized overgrowth of cartilage, resembling osteochondroma. It usually affects the lower limbs and it is also known as dysplasia epiphysealis hemimelica (DEH) or Fairbanks Syndrome. It affects the epiphyseal plate, or growth plate, at the end of a long bone. The plate is found in children and adolescents, but not adults, whose epiphyseal plate is replaced by epiphyseal line. The disease was named after researcher David Trevor, who believed the disease to be a congenital error in epiphyseal development that affects limb buds during early fetal life.

Trevor's Disease is a benign disorder, and no cases of malignant transformation have been reported. The causes are not known and the disease does not appear to be genetically transmitted. Typically a lesion will grow in size until skeletal maturity with a progression toward pain and arthrosis.

Patients with Trevor's Disease will have painless swelling or a mass on one side of the joint, limitation of motion, angular deformity, concomitant regional muscle wasting, and recurrent locking of the joint. It may be commonly confused with chondroblastoma, osteochondroma, or enchondroma.

Trevor's Disease should be treated if the lesion is causing pain, deformity, or interference with function.

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.

Do you have one toe that is much, much larger than all of the others, including your big toe?

 

 

 

What you have is likely localized gigantism, a condition in which a certain part of the body becomes an abnormal size because of excessive growth of the anatomical structures or abnormal accumulation of substances. When it affects the fingers and toes it is called macrodactyl, an uncommon congenital condition.
Macrodactyl more commonly affects the hands than feet. Typically only one foot is affected, with no more than one digit on that foot. Often times macrodactyl coexists with syndactyl, when two toes are fused together. It is a benign condition, but will look displeasing to you and your child.
Congenital causes of the condition include:

In cases of acquired localized gigantism, meaning you were not born with the deformity, causes may include:

  • Inflammation
  • Tumors, like osteoid osteomas
  • Still's disease
  • Arteriovenous malformations on a limb
  • Elephantiasis
  • Amyloidosis
  • Acromegaly

Treatment for localized gigantism and macrodactyl depends on the particular condition and may range from antibiotics, other medical therapy, and surgery to correct the anatomical deformity.

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.