Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for tag: Running

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
December 28, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Running   Shoes   Foot Type  

If you are an avid runner you may be familiar with the hype surrounding minimalist running shoes. While they are very popular, most runners would do best to try more conventional running footwear. Regardless, if you are interested in minimalist running shoes, it is important to do some runs in minimalist footwear and some runs in conventional footwear. This will help the feet adapt to your new footwear. Grass athletic fields are the best surface on which to try minimalist running, as the grass will absorb a portion of the impact.    

If you are a runner, wearing the right running shoe is essential. For more information, see one of our podiatrists of Connecticut Foot Care Center, LLC. Our doctors can treat your foot and ankle needs.

Choosing the Right Running Shoe for Your Foot Type

To increase performance and avoid the risk of injury, it is important to choose the right running shoe based on your foot type. The general design of running shoes revolves around pronation, which is how the ankle rolls from outside to inside when the foot strikes the ground.

  • Neutral runners are able to choose from a wide variety of shoes, including minimalist shoes or even go barefoot
  • Runners who overpronate, or experience an over-abundance of ankle rolling, should choose shoes that provide extra motion control and stability
  • Runners who underpronate, or supinate, have feet that have high arches and lack flexibility, preventing shock absorption. They require shoes with more flexibility and cushion

If you have any questions, please contact our offices located in Connecticut. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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By contactus@ctfootcare.com
November 09, 2015
Category: Foot Care
Tags: Exercise   Running   Barefoot  

 Thanks to the book “Born to Run” and its spin-off movie, barefoot running became a trending form of exercise. Hundreds of runners began to support the belief that naturally landing on the bare forefoot would lessen impending running injuries. With the trend came “barefoot shoes” that attempted to emulate the feeling of running barefoot without actually having to do so. While the excitement over barefoot running has died down, barefoot exercises are still being heralded for their ability to strengthen the foot and improve flexibility. Benefits also include better gait patterns, fall prevention for the elderly, and the rehabilitation of knee and hip pain. 

If you have any questions about barefoot running, contact one of our podiatrists from Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC. Our doctors will treat your foot and ankle needs.

Barefoot Running

Barefoot running is a fairly popular trend in the running world. More than just simply ‘running without shoes,” barefoot running affects the way your feet hit the ground and your overall posture. Barefoot runners land on the front part of their feet as opposed to those who wear shoes, who usually strike their heel as they hit the ground.

Barefoot running contains many advantages, including:

  • A lower risk for ankle and foot injuries
  • Improvement in balance and body  posture
  • Strengthens muscles in the lower legs, ankles and feet that are not normally worked when wearing shoes

There are also some disadvantages to barefoot running, which include:

  • Lack of shoes increases the risk of incurring blisters, scrapes, bruises and cuts
  • Risk of Achilles tendonitis as a result of landing on the front of your feet constantly
  • Needing time and transition to adjust as the switch cannot be automatic

Start on even, flat surfaces and consider investing in minimalist running shoes. Minimalist running shoes provide the ‘feel’ of barefoot running while affording the same protection you get from wearing shoes. Barefoot running can be safe and enjoyable with the proper planning and transition.

If you have any questions, please contact one of our offices located in Connecticut. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Lindsay Crouse of the New York Times believes that heavily padded bulky sneakers will be the next big thing when it comes to running calling the new trend “maximalist running shoes.” Although they look very similar to the gimmicky walking shoes from a few years ago, Olympic medalist Leo Manzano made the switch and believes the shoes had removed his plantar fasciitis after only a week. Beginning 2010, barefoot running was the new trend in physical activity since major runners believed this would reduce injury and general pain. Unfortunately barefoot runners are finding that their injuries are not going away with the activity causing a change in the number of minimalist runners to maximalists. Runners should not count on this new trend to immediately heal their pain since there is no real proof as of yet that the overly cushioned running shoes will make any real difference. “I don’t know that they are going to be the solution,” Crouse states, but she has a feeling runners will still try.

For more information about getting the correct shoe for your foot type consult with one of our podiatrists from Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC. Our doctors can measure your feet to determine what your needs are and help you find an appropriate pair of footwear.

Foot Health: The Differences between Walking & Running Shoes

There are great ways to stay in shape: running and walking are two great exercises to a healthy lifestyle. It is important to know that running shoes and walking shoes are not interchangeable. There is a key difference on how the feet hit the ground when someone is running or walking. This is why one should be aware that a shoe is designed differently for each activity.

You may be asking yourself what the real differences are between walking and running shoes and the answers may shock you.

Differences

Walking doesn’t involve as much stress or impact on the feet as running does. However, this doesn’t mean that you should be any less prepared. When you’re walking, you land on your heels and have your foot roll forward. This rolling motion requires additional support to the feet.

Flexibility – walking shoes are designed to have soft, flexible soles. This allows the walker to push off easily with each step.

If you have any questions, please contact one of our offices located in Connecticut. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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