Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for tag: Fungal Infections

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
April 15, 2019

It’s April, and that means we at Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC are celebrating National Foot Health Awareness Month. Having healthier feet is possible for all patients. And, it needn’t be time-consuming or complicated. Below are 8 simple steps to prevent common podiatric disorders and protect your feet and ankles.

  1. Don’t ignore foot or ankle pain. It’s your body’s way of telling you that something’s wrong. Make an appointment at one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices at the first sign of foot discomfort.
  2. Buy shoes that are the right size. It may sound astounding, but studies estimate that up to 90% of people are wearing shoes that are too small. Foot size can change over time. Get your feet professionally measured.
  3. Limit time in high heels with pointy toes. Styles that force the foot forward and squeeze toes together can increase the risk for bunions, hammertoes, and other deformities.
  4. Practice self-exams. Make inspecting your feet a regular habit. Report any unusual symptoms like swelling, lumps or growths and changes in toenails and skin to one of our podiatrists, Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. for prompt diagnosis and treatment.
  5. Trim toenails straight across and with no ragged edges. Don’t cut them too short and never round the edges as this can increase the risk of ingrown toenails.
  6. Keep feet dry. Fungal infections thrive in warm, damp places. If your feet sweat profusely, keep an extra pair of socks in your bag and change them whenever you notice your feet are damp. Consider using an anti-fungal powder daily as well.
  7. Wear flip-flops or shower shoes in public places. Gyms, nail salons, community pools and beach changing areas and restrooms are excellent places to pick up a bacterial or fungal infection.
  8. Don’t try to do the podiatrist’s job! Attempting to file down corns, remove warts or treat other foot problems on your own is likely to lead to injury or infection. Contact us today to request an appointment.
By Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC
August 27, 2017

It can become hard for the elderly to bend over and ensure that their feet are in top health. Some foot disorders common for the elderly include ingrown nails, diabetic ulcers, arthritis, fungal infections and corns. Symptoms of worsening conditions include a changing of color of feet to a bluish tint, a reduced sensation for pain, injuries that do not heal in a normal amount of time, numbness or cramping in your feet while walking or even while sitting for long periods of time.

 

Geriatric Foot Care is the care that elderly individuals must take for their feet because they are predisposed to a variety of foot complications. Some of these conditions can leave individuals in a disabled state if they do not prevent it from becoming more serious. Proper foot care will reduce common problems for the elderly and ensure that they are able to enjoy a quality of life that they originally expected to be able to experience. The elderly face a decrease in the quality of their bodily circulation. The decreased circulation is more difficult when the elderly have other conditions. Since geriatrics are less active, they have difficulties keeping their feet healthy. This is why geriatrics should inspect their feet on a daily basis to help them discover any abnormalities. They should avoid walking barefoot and keep their feet clean and dry by using creams or powder prescribed by their doctor. Toenails should be trimmed in a straight line. Geriatrics should practice sitting in a manner that prevents their knees from being crossed because it further cuts circulation. Our team, Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Richard E. Ehle, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M. and Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M., can help geriatrics with determining the best mode of treatment at the Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC, located in Rocky Hill, Bristol, Middletown, Glastonbury, Newington and Kensington, Connecticut. Contact us today to find out about advanced geriatric foot car. This should be thought of as a daily routine rather than a now and then type of occurrence. Our treatment is designed to keep our geriatric patient’s health in top shape.

 

 

To avoid the possible side effects that accompany prescription drugs, natural remedies are available for use to treat Athlete’s foot. Apple cider vinegar or tea tree oil can be rubbed directly onto areas affected by Athlete’s foot. To create a solution to soak your feet in, mix one part white vinegar and two parts warm water. Soak the feet in this for fifteen minutes. Similarly, garlic can be grinded into a fine paste, mixed into a tub of water, and used as a fifteen-minute soak for the feet. Another remedy can be found in neem leaves, which can be boiled in water for ten minutes. After the water has cooled, wash feet twice a day in the solution to treat Athlete’s foot.

Athlete’s foot can be treated successfully using any of the aforementioned methods. If you would like assistance with the treatment of Athlete’s foot, consult with one of our podiatrists at Connecticut Foot Care Centers. Our podiatrists will attend to all of your foot and ankle needs and answer any of your related questions.

Athlete’s Foot: The Sole Story

If you suffer from itching, burning, dry, and flaking feet, this may be a sign of athlete's foot. Athlete's foot, also known as tinea pedis, can be extremely contagious, and it often infects shower floors, gyms, socks and shoes, and anywhere else feet may come in contact with. It is commonly found in public changing areas and bathrooms, dormitory style living quarters, around locker rooms and public swimming pools.

Solutions to Combat Athlete’s Foot

- Hydrate your feet by using lotion
- Exfoliate
- Buff off nails
- Use of anti-fungal product
- Examine feet and visit your doctor if any suspicious blisters or cuts are present.

What is Tinea?

- Athlete’s foot is often caused by the same fungus that causes ringworm (tinea).
- Tinea can invade other parts of the body as well, if the proper thriving conditions for it are met.
- Tinea thrives in mostly dark, warm and moist environments.
- Although many people never experience athlete’s foot, around 70% of the population may suffer from tinea at some point.

For more information about Athlete’s Foot, follow the link below.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Connecticut. We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Athlete’s Foot