Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for tag: Ankle Pain

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
October 17, 2019
Category: ankle pain
Tags: foot pain   Ankle Pain   ankle swollen  

At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we know that swollen ankles can be uncomfortable and even painful. Thanks to gravity, your ankles and feet are prime areas for excess fluid in your body to collect. The reasons behind the swelling--known as edema in the medical world—can range from something minor to a major medical concern. Below are seven possible causes of swelling in your ankles.

  1. It’s the beginning of arthritis. Not just a single disease, arthritis is an umbrella term that covers over 100 conditions that can negatively affect the health of your joints. Joint inflammation can result in swelling. You may also feel pain and experience redness and heat around the joint.
  2. You’re not moving—simply standing or sitting in one place for too long can cause ankles to swell.
  3. You’ve put on a few extra pounds. Being overweight can put extra stress on your joints and trigger fluid retention. In severely overweight or obese people, extra fat cells contain excess hormones which can also cause your body to retain water.
  4. You have high blood pressure or heart disease. Swelling in your ankles (and your feet and legs) can be a sign that your heart is not pumping properly.
  5. You’ve got a bacterial infection. Although it’s possible to have an infection develop from a wound in or near your ankle joint, any bacteria that enters your bloodstream can end up causing an infection in any of your joints. Telltale signs of infection include heat and redness around the joint and also a fever.
  6. It’s your medication. There are several medicines, both prescription and over the counter that can cause fluid retention and swollen ankles. These include certain blood pressure medications, some antidepressants, hormones and anti-inflammatory steroids. Even NSAIDs such as ibuprofen can cause ankles to blow up.
  7. Your veins aren’t working the way they should. Over time, veins can stretch out and valves in them can start to leak, resulting in blood pooling your ankles and feet. This is more likely to happen if you are over the age of 50 and female.

Ongoing swelling of your ankles or swelling that gets worse suddenly or is accompanied by other serious symptoms like fever, shortness of breath or feeling lightheaded requires immediate medical attention. Contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices and our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. will perform a complete podiatric examination to determine the cause of your ankle swelling and the correct treatment.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
September 17, 2019

At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we’re starting to see a predictable increase in appointments for younger patients experiencing fall sports injuries. Many pediatric problems in young athletes can be avoided. Below are some common sports injuries and how to prevent them.

Plantar Fascitis—a long band of tissue known as the plantar fascia runs along the bottom of the foot. When the plantar fascia becomes aggravated and inflamed, your child can experience pain in the arch of the foot and also heel pain. This tends to be a recurring problem. In many cases, plantar fasciitis is related to a defect in foot structure. If your child has overly high arches or flat feet, he or she may need special footwear or a custom orthotic device to play sports comfortably.

Shin Splints—pain and swelling in the front of the lower part of the legs are the characteristic symptoms of this source of discomfort. Shin splints are often the result of repetitive activities like running. Changing training regimens stretches for the calves and properly supportive sports shoes can all help alleviate and prevent this condition.

Sever’s Disease—this condition specifically affects children in the age range of 8 to about 15. Until the heel bone is fully developed, new growth is constantly occurring, leaving a vulnerable area in the growth plate at the back of the heel. Overly-strenuous practices and sports that feature repeated pounding of the heel on hard surfaces, such as basketball, track, and soccer, can increase the risk for Sever’s Disease. In addition to rest periods, other ways to reduce irritation include: maintaining an appropriate weight, stretching exercises and correct footwear or support if your child has flat feet or high arches.

Achilles tendonitis—inflammation of this long tendon in the back of the leg that connects the calf muscle to the heel is most often the result of doing too much too quickly. It’s important that children and teen's condition themselves before the sports season and that coaches follow a training regimen that gradually increases the intensity and duration of physical activity.

If your child experiences pain or discomfort in their feet and ankles during or after sports, make an appointment at one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices as soon as possible. Our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. Will find the source of your child’s pediatric pain and prescribe the correct treatment to help them safely and comfortably enjoy their fall sport.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
August 20, 2019
Category: ankle
Tags: foot pain   Ankle Pain   Surgery   podiatric tips  

If you have a toe, foot or ankle surgery coming up, we at Connecticut Foot Care Centers believe in the Boy Scout motto, “Be prepared.” There are many podiatric conditions where a surgical procedure may provide the best or the only relief to foot pain and disability. Some of the more common ones include:

If one of our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. has recommended a surgical solution for a foot problem, discussing the following areas will help you plan appropriately and be more confident about the surgery.

The Procedure—the foot doctor will explain the surgical procedure to you. If there is any part that you don’t understand, ask questions. Some things you’ll want to know include:

  • Will the surgery be done in one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices? Today, many podiatric surgeries can be done on an outpatient basis.
  • Is there any pre-op testing needed?
  • What type of anesthesia will be used?
  • How long will the procedure take, and will I need someone to drive me home when it is over?

Post-Op Care—a big question on most patients’ minds is how much pain will I be in after the surgery? The podiatrist can address this with you as well as what pain management options will be available. You’ll also want to know if the foot that’s been operated on will be immobilized and if you will need assistive devices such as crutches, a motor scooter or surgical shoes.

Recovery—it’s important to have a realistic understanding of the recovery period from your surgery. How long will it be before you can bear weight on the affected foot? Drive? Resume work and regular activities? This will help you arrange for enough time off from work and enlist any help you might need from family and friends.

Follow Up—even after you’re able to return to work and normal activities, there may be physical therapy or other additional treatment necessary to complete the rehabilitation of your foot.

We want to ease any fears or anxiety that you may be feeling if you have an upcoming surgery. If you have unanswered questions, don’t hesitate to contact us for answers.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
May 14, 2019
Category: ankle pain

Do you suffer from ongoing ankle pain or stiffness? Do your ankles feel weak and do they frequently twist or give way when you are walking or standing? At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we know that chronic ankle problems can be very debilitating and prevent you from leading the active life you love.

Tracking Down the Cause

 

The first step if you are experiencing uncomfortable ankle symptoms is to contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices for an appointment. One of our podiatrists, Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M., will do a complete examination of your ankle and foot. The foot doctor will want to get information about previous ankle sprains and injuries as part of a complete medical history. The podiatrist may order x-rays (which can be done in office) or other imaging studies in addition to physically checking your ankle for signs of tenderness, pain or swelling.

The most common cause of chronic ankle pain and instability is a previous sprain that was not fully rehabilitated. Too often patients don’t complete all the sessions of physical therapy or other treatment recommendations of their podiatrist because the pain stops, and they think they are ready to resume all their regular activities again. But, in addition to the ligaments being healed, surrounding muscles also need to be retrained and strengthened to give the ankle the full support needed to prevent further sprains. Other possible sources of ankle pain and weakness include:

  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • An undetected stress fracture
  • Tendonitis
  • Nerve compression (tarsal tunnel syndrome)
  • Infection
  • A biomechanical defect affecting the structural alignment of the foot and ankle

Relieving Painful Symptoms

 

Once the podiatrist has determined the source of the symptoms you are experiencing with your ankle, the proper course of treatment can be determined. There are several options available including bracing, physical therapy, exercises, and surgery. The foot doctor will discuss the best choice for you. Don’t delay seeking treatment for chronic ankle problems. Contact us today.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
April 15, 2019

It’s April, and that means we at Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC are celebrating National Foot Health Awareness Month. Having healthier feet is possible for all patients. And, it needn’t be time-consuming or complicated. Below are 8 simple steps to prevent common podiatric disorders and protect your feet and ankles.

  1. Don’t ignore foot or ankle pain. It’s your body’s way of telling you that something’s wrong. Make an appointment at one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices at the first sign of foot discomfort.
  2. Buy shoes that are the right size. It may sound astounding, but studies estimate that up to 90% of people are wearing shoes that are too small. Foot size can change over time. Get your feet professionally measured.
  3. Limit time in high heels with pointy toes. Styles that force the foot forward and squeeze toes together can increase the risk for bunions, hammertoes, and other deformities.
  4. Practice self-exams. Make inspecting your feet a regular habit. Report any unusual symptoms like swelling, lumps or growths and changes in toenails and skin to one of our podiatrists, Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. for prompt diagnosis and treatment.
  5. Trim toenails straight across and with no ragged edges. Don’t cut them too short and never round the edges as this can increase the risk of ingrown toenails.
  6. Keep feet dry. Fungal infections thrive in warm, damp places. If your feet sweat profusely, keep an extra pair of socks in your bag and change them whenever you notice your feet are damp. Consider using an anti-fungal powder daily as well.
  7. Wear flip-flops or shower shoes in public places. Gyms, nail salons, community pools and beach changing areas and restrooms are excellent places to pick up a bacterial or fungal infection.
  8. Don’t try to do the podiatrist’s job! Attempting to file down corns, remove warts or treat other foot problems on your own is likely to lead to injury or infection. Contact us today to request an appointment.