By Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC
February 17, 2020
Category: Foot Conditions

Every February, the American Heart Association sponsors American Heart Month. What’s heart health got to do with your feet? At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we’re glad you asked! Keeping your arteries clear of plaque and cholesterol is an important part of keeping your heart healthy. It’s also essential for maintaining good circulation—something your legs and feet depend on. Poor circulation can result in neuropathy or nerve damage, which can cause a loss of sensation in your feet. It can make it difficult to detect cuts, infections, and injuries. Decreased blood flow also results in less oxygenated blood getting to your feet and toes, which slows healing and can lead to wounds and ulcers. Fortunately, there is much you can do to prevent heart disease.

Here are the American Heart Association’s “Life’s Simple 7” risk factors you can control.

  1. Manage Blood Pressure—Having high blood pressure significantly increases your risk of heart attack and stroke. You can help lower your blood pressure by losing weight, exercising regularly, and finding ways to reduce stress.

  2. Control Cholesterol—Elevated cholesterol contributes to artery-clogging plaque, which can cause heart disease and stroke. Cholesterol is normally controlled by diet and medication.

  3. Reduce Blood Sugar—An important first step is learning what your blood sugar levels are. If you need to lower them, diet plays a huge role. Sugar is hidden in many foods—look for ingredients that end in “ose,” such as fructose. Keeping blood sugar levels where they should also reduce your risk of diabetes—a disease that can cause several problems for your feet.

  4. Get Active—Being physically active has many benefits for your heart (and the rest of your body). It helps your heart pump more efficiently, aids in weight reduction, and helps alleviate stress.

  5. Eat Better—One of the biggest weapons in fighting heart disease is your diet. Reducing the amounts of saturated and trans fats that you eat, controlling portion size, and making healthy swaps can reduce your risk for heart attacks and cardiovascular disease.

  6. Lose Weight—Carrying excess weight puts a strain on your heart, lungs, blood vessels, and your bones and joints. As you lose weight, you’ll feel better physically and feel better about yourself.

  7. Stop Smoking—People who smoke cigarettes are at the highest risk for heart disease.

Changes in your feet and legs such as skin discoloration, swelling, and toenail thickening can all be early signs of heart disease. If you experience any unusual symptoms in your feet, contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices.  We offer convenient early morning and late appointments to accommodate your busy schedule. Our podiatrists, Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. and Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. will examine your feet and determine if a problem is present and how to treat it.

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