Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for: September, 2013

If you've studied history, you've likely heard of trench foot before. Trench foot was a common condition soldiers during WWI developed due to prolonged exposure to cold, wet, and unsanitary conditions in the trenches of Germany and France. 

The term was first coined during Napoleon's time, during the Napoleonic Wars of 1812. It was during the retreat from Russia the condition was noted and has since become a problem for men who are in trench warfare in the winter, like in WWI, WWII, and the Vietnam War. It is said that people even developed trench foot during the 1998 and 2007 Glastonbury Festival, the 2009 Leeds Festival, and the 2012 Download Festival as a result of the muddy, cold, and wet conditions at these events. 

Affected feet will become numb, either by turning red or blue as a result of poor circulation to the feet. Feet may develop a particular decaying odor due to early necrosis setting in. As the condition worsens, the feet will begin to swell. Advanced stages of trench foot include blistering and open sores which lead to fungal infections, also known as tropical ulcer, or jungle rot. 

When left untreated, trench foot results in gangrene, which necessitates the need for amputation. If trench foot is caught early, a complete recovery is possible, but severe short-term pain may be felt when sensation returns to the appendages. Since you've had trench foot before, you are more susceptible to having it again in the future.

Trench foot can occur in temperatures as high as 60 degrees Fahrenheit; it does not have to be cold water for it to happen.

To prevent trench foot, keep your feet warm and dry. Make sure you put on clean and dry socks and shoes daily. Treat the affected part by applying warm packs or soaking in warm water for five minutes. When sleeping or resting, do not wear socks. 

For soldiers, regular foot inspections are a key preventative measure. They were paired and made responsible for the other's feet. When left by themselves, soldiers would leave their socks and boots on. As the war raged on, the time spent in the trenches decreased.

Reference: CDC

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

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Bonnie Stein, a racing coach in Redington Shores, FL says that "Walkers wear their shoes way too long. They'll show me their soles and and 'See, my shoes still have treads.' But well before your treads wear, your midsole shock absorbers die." At that point, you might as well be walking barefoot.

Here are a couple tips to help you determine when it's time to buy a new pair of shoes:

  • If you walk 45 minutes to an hour three times a week, replace shoes after 5 months.
  • If you walk 45 minutes to an hour four times a week, replace shoes after 4 months.
  • If you walk 45 minutes to an hour five times a week, replace shoes after 3 months. 

Can't remember when you last purchased shoes? Get a new pair soon and write the purchase date on the instep so you'll remember.

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

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Clubfoot, one of the most common birth deformities, occurs in 1 out of every 1,000 live births and is when the foot turns inward and downward. It is congenital and may be passed down through families in some cases. Risk factors include a family history and being male.

The condition can range from mild and flexible to severe and rigid. Each case of clubfoot may appear different from child to child. It may also be difficult to place the foot in the correct position. The calf muscle and foot may also be smaller than normal.

The deformity is often diagnosed right after birth, when a foot x-ray may be performed to view the extent of the disorder. clubfootOften the problem is a very tight Achilles tendon, and a simple procedure can be done to release it.

Treatment should be started as early as possible, ideally right after birth when it is easiest to reshape the foot. The best method of treating clubfoot is moving the foot into the correct position and casting the limb to hold it in place. Recasting and gentle stretching will be done every week to improve the position of the foot. 5 to 10 casts are typically needed, with the final cast left on for 3 weeks. After the foot is in the correct position the child will wear a special brace all day for 3 months, then at night and during naps for up to 3 years.

Severe cases of clubfoot will require further surgery to correct the deformity if conservative treatments do not work or if the problem returns. A small number of defects may not be completely fixed and treatment will only improve the appearance and function of the foot. These cases are usually associated with other birth disorders. The child should be monitored by a podiatric physician until the foot is fully grown. Most cases are resolved with conservative treatment and the outcome is excellent.

If your child is being treated for clubfoot, call your podiatrist if you see any of the following:

  • The toes swell, bleed, or change color under the cast. 
  • The cast is causing the child pain.
  • The toes disappear into the cast.
  • The cast slides off.
  • The foot begins to turn in again after treatment.

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

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Alex Lenkei is a hypnotist who makes his living hypnotizing his crowd and making them believe and do things they would not normally.

So when it was time for him to have ankle replacement surgery, Lenkei did what came naturally to himself: he hypnotized himself. And had his surgery without anesthesia. 

Yes, that's right, Lenkei had ankle replacement surgery without anesthesia. 

This was not the 66 year old's first time doing this; he's had six operations done this way. However, this was the first time for orthopedic surgeon Dominic Nielson. 

Dr. Nielson did the two hour operation, which involved cutting through Lenkei's bone, at Epsom Hospital in Surrey. 

"It was certainly a bit nerve-wracking making the first cut, not being sure whether he would be able to feel it, but once we got through that bit it became very much like doing any other ankle replacement," Dr. Nielson said. 

"He did amazingly well with the whole thing. To be honest, it was just like doing any other operation. Alex went through the whole process, which took a very short period of time, and he told us he was ready to go ahead... It sort of went out of my head that he was awake and able to correspond.

"He made a couple of comments during the operation which obviously reminded us that this was a strange experience. He commented at one point on the noise of the saws and was just asking how it was going. It was very strange."

An anesthesiologist was on hand just in case anything went wrong during the July 8th operation, but he was not needed. 

Lenkei said, "I'm not averse to anesthesia- it's just that my pain control is a hell of a lot better than the medical profession's and I heal a lot quicker because my body doesn't have to get rid of all of the chemicals. Most doctors are scared because obviously it is not something that they come across in the medical profession, as such.
"The brain is a very sophisticated computer and if you press the right buttons it will do amazing things- if you press the right buttons it will switch certain things off."

All we can say is "WOW".  

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.


By CT Foot Care Podiatrists
September 10, 2013
Category: Celebrities

British rapper Wretch 32 is suffering from a swollen foot. 

Wretch 32, real name Jermaine Scott Sinclair, was in agony while performing at England's Reading and Leeds Festival last weekend after sustaining a mysterious injury several days earlier. 

The Don't Go hitmaker told Britain's Daily Star newspaper, "When I came off the stage last week my trainer felt really tight on my left foot. I took it off and it was mad swollen and it kinda (sic) hurts. I'll be cool though. I'll have a little drink to numb it up."

Wretch 32 is set to release his upcoming album, Growing Over Life, later this year. 

Reference: Contact Music

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.