Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for: August, 2013

Webbed toes are when two or more toes are fused together. We typically think of animals, like ducks and frogs to have webbed toes, not humans. During our fetal development, we all have fingers and toes that are webbed. At six to eight weeks of development, an enzyme dissolves the tissues between our digits. But 1 in every 2,000 births results in webbed toes. Webbed toes can also be called duck toes, twin toes, or tiger toes.

The most commonly webbed toes are the second and third toes, and there are six types of webbed toes:

  • Simple. Adjacent toes are joined by soft tissue and skin only.
  • Complex. Bones of the toes are fused together. This is very rare.
  • Complete. The skin joins the toes from top to bottom. 
  • Incomplete. The skin is joined partially by skin, usually only to the first joint. 
  • Fenestrated. Skin is joined for most of the toe, but there is a gap in the middle. 
  • Polysyndactyl. There is an extra digit webbed to an adjacent digit.

This condition will not impair a person's ability to walk, run, jump, or swim, however many feel embarrassed or experience low self esteem.
The cause of webbed toes is unknown. Some people used to believe it was an inherited trait, but sometimes only one person in the family would have webbed toes. Studies suggest a woman's nutritional intake during early gestation and smoking during pregnancy may contribute to this deformity. Webbed toes are also associated with the following conditions:

Diagnosis may occur even before birth with a sonogram, or at birth. Additional symptoms indicate there is an underlying syndrome.
Webbed toes can be separated surgically, even though this condition does not cause any health problems (unless there is an underlying condition). Your doctor will use a skin graft from your thigh, which fill in the missing skin, to surgically separate your toes. Results will vary on the severity of the webbing and the underlying bone structure. Surgery will begin with general anesthesia and the surgeon marking off the areas that will be repaired. The procedure can last from 2 to 4 hours, depending on the severity of the condition. Most patients are required to stay in the hospital for up to 2 days after surgery. Many patients experience swelling and bruising, but that is normal. Pain medication will be prescribed to deal with the pain and discomfort. Once you are released from the hospital you will have to keep your bandages clean and dry for up to 3 weeks. Skin grafts can be very dry, and using lotion will help moisturize the area.
Complications of the surgery may include scarring and webbing growing back. There may also be post-operative swelling, severe pain, numbness, bluish discoloration, and tingling toes. If you experience any of these symptoms, call your podiatrist right away. Other complications include:

  • Skin graft damage, which may darken over time.
  • Breathing problems
  • Sore throat from tubation
  • Excessive bleeding
  • Infection
  • Bad reaction to medications
  • May need second surgery

If you have webbed toes, consider asking your podiatrist the following questions:

  • Will I pass this on to my children?
  • Do you recommend surgery?
  • What are the risks?
  • What tests should I anticipate?
  • Are there non-surgical treatment options?
  • What nutrients reduce the risk of my child having webbed toes?

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

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children at the podiatristHave you noticed when your child walks or runs, their toes turn inward instead of pointing straight ahead? This is called intoeing, or more commonly known as being "pigeon-toed".

You may first notice this when your child begins to walk, but a child of any age may show signs of intoeing. Severe cases of intoeing will cause the child to stumble or trip as they catch their toes on the other heel. There is not usually pain associated with this foot deformity, nor does it lead to foot arthritis, as is popularly speculated.

For the majority of children under the age of 8, this condition will correct itself on its own, without the use of braces, casts, surgery, or other special treatment. Children who are suffering from pain from their intoeing, or there are signs of swelling or a limp should be seen by a podiatrist.

The cause of intoeing typically comes from an alignment issue from some area of the body. Three common conditions associated with intoeing are:

  • Curved foot
  • Twisted shin
  • Twisted thighbone

These conditions often run in families, but can occur on their own or in conjunction with other orthopedic problems. Prevention is not an option since those conditions occur from developmental or congenital disorders.

Curved foot, or metatarsus adductus, is when a child's feet bend inward from the middle part of the foot to the toes. This is different than clubfoot, but severe cases may look like one. Some cases may be mild and flexible, but others may be severe and stiff. Curved foot typically improves on its own over the first 4 to 6 months of a child's life. Babies over 6 months who still have this condition, which may have progressed, may be treated with casts or special shoes. Surgery to correct the deformity is rarely used.

Twisted shin, or tibial torsion, is when the child's lower leg (tibia) twists inward. This can occur before birth, as the legs rotate to fit in the tight space of the womb. After birth, most infant's legs rotate to align properly. When the lower leg remains turned in, twisted shin occurs. As the child begins to walk, their feet turn inward because the tibia in the lower leg points the foot inward. The tibia can untwist as the bone grows taller. Tibial torsion almost always improves on its own, usually before the child goes to school. Splints, special shoes, and exercise programs do not work. If the child is 8 to 10 years old, with a severe walking problem or limp and still has this condition, surgery may be required to reset the bone.

Twisted thighbone, or femoral anteversion, is when the child's thighbone turns inward. It will appear most obvious when the child is 5 or 6 years old. The top part of the thighbone, near the hip, has an increased twist, which allows the hip to turn in more than it should. If you watch your child walk, both their toes and their knees will turn in. When sitting, children with this condition are often in a "W" position, with their knees bent and their feet flared out behind them. Most cases of twisted thighbone correct themselves, often spontaneously. Like tibial torsion, special shoes, braces, and exercises do not help. Surgery is not usually considered unless the child is 9 or 10 years old and the deformity causes tripping and an unsightly gait. Surgery involves cutting the femur and rotating it to the correct position.

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.


Former Atomic Kitten singer Jenny Frost doesn't get much time to party anymore with a 5 year old and baby twins.

So Frost probably went overboard several weekends ago when she got some time off and went to a party in Ibiza with girlfriends. Frost ended up with a broken foot after a nasty accident on August 10th. She was hospitalized after falling over with friends on the Spanish party island.

After the accident, Frost is wearing a cast on her right foot. Frost tweeted pictures of her casted foot and wrote, "What an absolute numpty! What an absolute plonker I am!" She thanked the staff at the beach club in San Antonio for helping her after the accident occurred.

Frost recently celebrated her second anniversary to Spanish scuba diver Vicente "Vinnie" Juan Spiteri. She posted a photo montage on Twitter of their wedding day, tweeting, "2 years ago today I married the best person I know... @activedive. Love you baby x #bestdayever."

Reference: Daily Mail and Star Pulse.

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.


"Spider-Man: Turn Off the Dark" should just turn off the lights and call it a day.

From the very beginning, this Broadway musical has hosted many injuries, so many that one would think this show is cursed. 

The latest injury victim was dancer Daniel Curry, one of the show's nine costumed Spider-Man dancer/acrobats in the highly technical production with a lot of aerial wirework. Curry, a LaGuardia High School of Music & Art Performing Arts graduate in his 20's, was hurt in the second act when his foot become caught in one of the "elevators," the automatic lifts that rise and drop to create openings in the stage. 

The performance at the Foxwoods Theater came to an immediate halt and the rest of the show was cancelled as crew members came out with a privacy curtain and worked to free Curry. Firefighters also arrived at the scene to help. 

As of Friday, Curry was still in the hospital. "Daniel Curry remains in the hospital in stable condition, having sustained an injury to his foot," said show spokeman Rick Miramontez in a statement. "Friday's performance will go on as scheduled. The technical elements of the show are all in good working order, and we can confirm that equipment malfunction was not a factor in the incident. Our thoughts are with Daniel and his family." 

The injuries on the show have become the butt of several jokes. At the 2011 Tony Awards, host Neil Patrick Harris quipped, "Pretty soon they'll be turning the name to 'Spider-Man: Turn Off the Lawsuits' and 'Spider-Man: The Only Show That Warns You About Strobelights and Falling Actors.'" 

References: The Wrap and Newsday

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.


Fringe actor Joshua Jackson hobbled through security at Los Angeles airport on Monday on crutches with a mysterious foot injury.

The Vancouver native and his longtime girlfriend, actress Diane Krueger were at LAX catching a flight to London.

The former "Dawson's Creek" star was seen with a special brace on his right foot with his big toe heavily bandaged.

It is unknown how the 35 year old actor injured his foot, as he was seen Friday at a Whole Foods store with Krueger and he was walking fine.

Reference: Global News

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.