Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for: July, 2013

Adult cavovarus foot is the result of an imbalance of muscle forces, usually from motor sensory neuropathies. cerebral palsy, cerebral injury (stroke), anterior horn cell disease (spinal root injury), talar neck injury, and residual clubfoot.

It is seldom seen at birth, but the deformity becomes apparent as the child, or the deformity grows. Other causes include 

In this foot deformity, the strong peroneus longus and tibialis posterior muscles cause the hindfoot varus and forefoot varus (pronated) position. Hindfoot varus causes overload of the border of the foot, which results in ankle instability, stress fractures, and peroneal tendonitis. In overloaded joints, degenerative arthritis can develop. Claw toes may also be a symptom of this deformity.

Your podiatrist will do a gait examination, which allows for the planning of tendon transfers to correct the stance and swing-phrase deficits. They will also inspect the forefoot and hindfoot to determine the need for soft-tissue release and osteotomy. The Coleman block test assesses the cause of hindfoot varus.

Oddly enough, prolonged use of orthotics and supportive shoes can result in muscle imbalance, creating the deformity and causing irreversible damage to the tendons and joints. Your doctor will have to rebalance the tendons to avoid deterioration of the foot. Muscle imbalance can be rectified by tendon transfer, corrective osteotomy, and fusion.

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

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Kohler's Disease is a rare bone disorder of the foot found in children between the ages of 6 and 9, affecting boys more than girls. It was first described in 1908 by Alban Kohler a German radiologist.

It is caused when the navicular bone temporarily loses its blood supply and as a result, the tissue in the bone dies and the bone collapses.

Symptoms include pain and swelling in the middle of the foot and usually a limp. Patients who limp tend to put increased weight on the lateral side of their foot. They may also experience tenderness over the navicular and pain over the apex.

In February 2010 the Journal of the American Medical Association reported that Egyptian boy king Tutankhamun may have died from complications of the disease along with malaria.

Your podiatrist will take an X-ray of the affected foot to diagnose the disease. The affected foot will have a sclerotic and flattened navicular bone.

When treated, this disease has no long term affects, but rarely it can return in adults. Treatment includes resting the affected foot, taking pain relievers, and avoiding putting pressure on the foot. In severe cases, the patient wears a cast, worn between 6 and 8 weeks. After the cast is removed, arch supports are worn for about 6 months. Children may benefit from moderate exercise and physical therapy. Children who follow the prescribed treatment will heal quickly. Kohler's Disease may persist for some time, but most cases are resolved within two years.

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

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Freiberg's Disease is a painful condition that affects the second metatarsal head. This is the bony knuckle in the ball of the foot behind the second toe. It can also affect the third and fourth metatarsal bones, but they are less commonly affected.

More than 80% of cases are females, and most of those are women up to the age of 20 years. Children who are athletes are often most commonly affected, especially those who are on their toes a lot in sprinting or jumping. The primary complaint is often vague forefoot pain, worsened by activity and weight-bearing and relieved with rest.

Freiberg's Disease occurs in children when there is a disruption of blood flow to the tip of the bone because of excessive pressure. It happens at the site of the growth plate, which closes in adolescence and therefore does not affect adults. In some cases a mechanical cause is thought to be the reason for the condition. A traumatic event, such as a heavy blow, or several small incidents can also cause Freiberg's Disease.

Freiberg's Infarction is the term applied when it occurs to children. Infarct means tissue death because of lack of blood. It is likely the excessive pressure causes a small fracture to occur within the cartilage growth plate that is between the long shaft of the metatarsal bone and the head, cutting off the blood flow. On an x-ray the area will be transparent as calcium leaves the bone, which will collapse on itself. The process takes about a year and when it is complete, the bone will be denser and whiter. An x-ray will also show the flattening of the rounded tip of the metatarsal bone and thickening of the shaft.

Freigberg's Infraction is applied to adults where the x-rays are similar. Most people have two or three arteries supplying blood to the area, but some have only one artery, making possible bone death. In others, the first metatarsal does not function properly and shuns its share of the body weight over the second, third, and fourth bones.

Treatment includes examination of the foot, which should show the area to be swollen, stiff, and painful. To find the tender spot, the podiatrist will flex the toe back as far as possible to expose the end of the metatarsal as well as the bottom surface. Treatment will focus on reducing the pressure on the second metatarsal head, by deflecting the pressure away from the area, causing the first metatarsal to take its share of the weight.

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

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Polydactyl is a deformity present at birth, when the baby is born with extra fingers or toes. It usually occurs in single duplication, meaning just one extra digit.

Associated anomalies include duplications bilaterally (both feet) in 40-50% of patients, but often duplications are not symmetrical. Syndactyl (webbing) of the toes occurs in 1/5 of patients, and Down's Syndrome is present in a minority of patients. Only 30% of patients will have a positive family history of polydactyl.

It occurs in 1 to 2 of 1,000 births, in 0.3 to 1.3 of 1,000 caucasian births, and 4 of 1,000 black births, and males more than females.

Polydactyl occurs when the body follows a different set of directions when forming the feet during development. Researchers are still learning about the genes that cause polydactyl. It may be caused by an associated syndrome, like Greig Cephalopolysyndactyly Syndrome (GCPS) or Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (BBS).

Extra digits are often poorly developed and attached by a small stalk, generally on the little toe. Some are well-formed and may even function. Poorly formed digits are usually removed. If there are no bones in the toe, tying a string around it will cause the toe to fall off over time.

In older patients, the main complaint is difficulty with shoe gear.

Treatment of polydactyl is typically surgery, which excises the toe, providing the toe with the most normal contour, to facilitate shoe wear. Typically the most lateral toe is excised, depending on whether the deformity is pre or post axial. Pre-axial means the extra toe is adjacent to the big toe, while post-axial means they are adjacent to the pinky toe. Most surgeons will recommend surgery after 1 year, to reduce aesthetic risks, and prior to walking, allowing for the greatest potential for remodeling. Patients are often referred in at ages 4 or 5 because of difficulty with shoe wear.

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.


Actress Emma Watson injured her foot on the set of Sofia Coppola's new movie The Bling Ring after a

stiletto wearing extra put her heel through Watson's toe. Owie! Just another reason not to wear stilettos- not only do they hurt your feet, they are a lethal weapon!

The former Harry Potter star plays one of the "Bling-Ring" thieves, who stole more than $3 million worth of items from the Hollywood homes of celebrities like Lindsay Lohan, Paris Hilton, and Orlando Bloom. In one particular scene Watson heads to a nightclub to party. 

Watson told Teen Vogue, "We were doing this scene in a nightclub and this girl accidentally put her stiletto through my toe! And the crazy thing is, I had so much adrenaline going through my system that I just kept dancing until, finally, I looked down at my foot and saw the blood."

The actress has also made news recently after condemning extravagant celebrity lifestyles. Watson called this lifestyle "consumerism as a form of kleptomania."

Watson, who has a reported fortune of $26 million pounds,  revealed she only owns eight pairs of shoes and was flabbergasted walking into some of the celebrity homes they shot The Bling Ring in. 

The celebrity who had the most items stolen from her house, heiress Paris Hilton, gave permission for them to film in her home. Watson said walking into Hilton's expansive walk-in closets was like walking into a department store.

"She could never wear all of those clothes and half of them were brand new and she still had the price tag on. But I suppose she just bought them to have them. We've all bought things on impulse but that's an entirely different thing," Watson said.

Reference: Star Pulse and Daily Mail

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.