Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for category: foot deformities

By Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC
August 26, 2017
Category: foot deformities
Tags: Orthotics   Flat Feet  

It’s no secret that every human being is slightly different from the other. Our eye color, shape, race, sex, can all differ from person to person. The same can be said about out feet. At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC in Rocky Hill, Bristol, Newington, Glastonbury, Middletown, and Kensington, Connecticut, Jeffrey Kahn, DPM  has seen all kinds of feet. He has seen deformed feet, athletic feet, blistered feet, broken feet, high arched feet, and even flat feet.

Pancake feet or flat feet, are very common among all types of people. The foot usually forms an arch a little after two years old. Sometimes, due to growth, genetics, or poor footwear, the foot develops without an arch and stays that way permanently. Flat feet can cause a person a lot of pain, especially if they are constantly on their feet and staying active. 

What constitutes a flat foot?

A podiatrist has seen the “average foot” many times and often uses it as a comparison when looking at the arch. If the arch seems to align similarly to the “average” foot then it is not considered flat. If there is a more significant arch than the “average” foot than it is considered to have a high arch. If the arch is much lower than the “average” foot than it is considered to be flat.

What difference does a flat foot make?

Previously, if you had flat feet it could disqualify you from becoming a soldier in the United States Military. Recently, that rule has lifted and flat feet are not considered a disqualifier any longer. Flat feet can also cause pain to athletes, nurses, and other people who are constantly using their feet. It will make them tired, achy, and can cause deformities if not properly treated.

How can I help my flat feet?

Properly fitting footwear is key to surviving flat feet. Make sure that the shoes you buy have a lot of stability, support, and fit snugly, but not too tight. This will allow the foot to move comfortably without adding any extra unnecessary pressure to the foot. 

Orthotics can also be beneficial to those who suffer from flat feet. A small device that is custom made for your specific foot and ailment can be inserted into your shoe and provide the stability and comfort that you may otherwise be lacking. 

Do you think an orthotic will help your flat feet? Do your feet constantly ache and you don’t know why? Call 860-563-1200 or make an appointment online today. We are dedicated to your foot and ankle care.

By Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC
August 26, 2017
Category: foot deformities
Tags: hammertoes   Health   ligaments  

Hammertoes have a surprising way of impacting your overall foot and ankle health! They happen when the first toe bends in an irritating manner at the joint. This condition can get more serious if left untreated. Our team of podiatrists, Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Richard E. Ehle, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M. and Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M., can help to treat this condition. Come visit us at the Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC, located in Rocky Hill, Bristol, Middletown, Glastonbury, Newington and Kensington, Connecticut.

 

Hammertoes occur from an imbalance with muscles and ligaments around the toe joint which produces a bend in the middle joint of the toe. When this bending occurs, the toe become stuck in an awkward position. Hammertoes generally affect women in large numbers. The most common complaint is rubbing and irritation on the top of the bent toe. This occurs because women wear shoes that cause the toe to bend in an unnatural way. It may be stylish to wear certain shoes, but these choices have lasting consequences on the health of your toes. This condition causes the joints to collapse, making the toe point upwards. 

 

Hammertoes are a serious problem for diabetics because of their poor circulation and because they have a higher risk for contracting diseases and foot ulcers. Because certain individuals are more susceptible to this condition, surgery may be the only choice if your hammertoes become seriously bent due to a lack of preventative measures. Removal of the joint or redirecting the tendon may be used as surgical procedures and will ensure proper foot health. Exercises may help prevent the need for surgery, but stretching your toes is one of the best methods to get better since it has the beneficial effect of relaxing your tendons.  

 

As you can see, Hammertoes are no joke. If you are experiencing this condition, please consider contacting our offices for an appointment as soon as possible. We will determine the best course of treatment specifically tailored for your wonderful feet and make sure those hammertoes don’t hammer away at your comfort anymore!

 

 

Brachymetatarsia is a condition in which one of the bones of the foot is significantly shorter than the others. This condition brachymetarasalgiatypically affects the fourth toe. When looking at the foot, the fourth toe is much shorter than those surrounding it, and it may also appear as if it is raised up, with the third and fifth toes touching below.

The condition may be as a result of a congenital defect or an acquired defect. Congenital causes include Aarskog syndrome and Apert syndrome among others, along with acquired trauma. Simply, the metatarsal bone fails to develop fully, or the growth plate closes prematurely. This condition appears 25 times more in women (1 in 1820) than men (1 in 4586). 

Diagnosis is easily done with an x-ray of the affected toe. Usually patients come in with concerns about the toe's appearance, looking for cosmetic surgery to correct the abnormal shape and size, but often learn that there is a significant defect in the bone. Patients may notice that the toe is not carrying its share of the weight, which results in pain and discomfort. They may also have a difficult time selecting shoes because of the toe's shape. 

In many cases brachymetatarsia causes no pain or discomfort and will require no treatment beyond careful shoe selection. For some, surgery may be needed. 

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

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Toe deformities are common in children. These conditions are generally congenital, with one or both parents with these problems. Toe issues are typically present at birth and will become worse over time. Unlike children who are "pigeon-toed", children rarely outgrow this deformity.

In infancy, toe deformities are not usually a sign of another condition. For parents, it's usually a cosmetic issue. But as the child grows, the toes transform from flexible to rigid and become symptomatic of another condition. Many toe deformities will respond to conservative treatment. Traditional treatment has been digital splitting and exercises, but those often do not lead to good outcomes. As the deformities progresses and the toes become more rigid, surgery is generally the only option.

Underlapping toes can be seen in both children and adults and typically affects the fourth and fifth toes. A special type of underlapping toes is called congenital curly toes, and is common among families. Toes three, four, and five may be affected.

The cause of the deformity is unknown, but may be due to an imbalance in muscle strength of the small muscles of the foot. Combined with a small abnormality in the placement of the joints of the foot below the ankle joint called the subtalar joint, it creates a pulling of the ligaments in the toes, causing them to curl. Weight bearing increases the deformity and the folding of the toes results in the formation of callus on the edge of the toe. Tight fitting shoes aggravate this condition.

Treatment depends on the age of the patient, degree of the deformity, and symptoms. When symptoms are minimal, most podiatrists will recommend waiting and seeing how the condition progresses. If surgery is required, the degree of the deformity determines the procedure. A flexible toe will only require a simple release of the tendon, but a rigid toe may necessitate the removal of part of the bone.

Overlapping toes are identified by one toe that lies on top of another toe. The fifth toe is most often affected, but the second toe can be as well. The cause of this deformity is not known as well, although it is speculated that the position of the fetus in the womb during development is a potential reason. Sometimes overlapping toes are seen in families.

Treatment for overlapping toes depends on how quickly the condition is diagnosed. For infants, passive stretching and adhesive taping is commonly prescribed. This treatment can take 6 to 12 weeks and recurrence of the deformity is likely. Like underlapping toes, this problem will rarely correct itself. Occasionally as the individual grows, the deformity will go away. If surgery is required, a skin plasty is required to release the contracture of the skin associated with the toe. A tendon release and release of the soft tissue around the joint at the base of the toe may also occur. Cases that are severe may require the toe to be held in place with a pin. The pin exits the tip of the toe and may be left in place for up to three weeks. During recuperation the patient must limit their activities and wear a surgical shoe or removable cast. Excessive movement will greatly affect the outcome of how the toe looks. Following removal of the pin splinting of the toe may be required for another two to three weeks.

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.

If you've studied history, you've likely heard of trench foot before. Trench foot was a common condition soldiers during WWI developed due to prolonged exposure to cold, wet, and unsanitary conditions in the trenches of Germany and France. 

The term was first coined during Napoleon's time, during the Napoleonic Wars of 1812. It was during the retreat from Russia the condition was noted and has since become a problem for men who are in trench warfare in the winter, like in WWI, WWII, and the Vietnam War. It is said that people even developed trench foot during the 1998 and 2007 Glastonbury Festival, the 2009 Leeds Festival, and the 2012 Download Festival as a result of the muddy, cold, and wet conditions at these events. 

Affected feet will become numb, either by turning red or blue as a result of poor circulation to the feet. Feet may develop a particular decaying odor due to early necrosis setting in. As the condition worsens, the feet will begin to swell. Advanced stages of trench foot include blistering and open sores which lead to fungal infections, also known as tropical ulcer, or jungle rot. 

When left untreated, trench foot results in gangrene, which necessitates the need for amputation. If trench foot is caught early, a complete recovery is possible, but severe short-term pain may be felt when sensation returns to the appendages. Since you've had trench foot before, you are more susceptible to having it again in the future.

Trench foot can occur in temperatures as high as 60 degrees Fahrenheit; it does not have to be cold water for it to happen.

To prevent trench foot, keep your feet warm and dry. Make sure you put on clean and dry socks and shoes daily. Treat the affected part by applying warm packs or soaking in warm water for five minutes. When sleeping or resting, do not wear socks. 

For soldiers, regular foot inspections are a key preventative measure. They were paired and made responsible for the other's feet. When left by themselves, soldiers would leave their socks and boots on. As the war raged on, the time spent in the trenches decreased.

Reference: CDC

If you believe have a foot problem and do not currently see a podiatrist, call one of our six locations to make an appointment.

Connecticut Foot Care Centers

Podiatrists in CT

Visit our website, like our page on Facebook, and follow our tweets on Twitter.