Next Step: Foot Care In Connecticut

Posts for category: diabetic foot care

By Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC
March 16, 2020
Category: diabetic foot care
Tags: Prevention   family history   lifestyle  

At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we see many patients who are suffering from debilitating foot problems from diabetes. These include foot pain, ulcers, and wounds that are extremely difficult to heal, infections, and injuries that occurred as a result of nerve damage, which decreased the ability to perceive pain in the feet. The good news is that if detected early, patients with type 2 diabetes can make changes that will reverse this disabling disease. The bad news is that nearly 1 in 4 adults with diabetes (approximately 7.2 million Americans) are unaware that they have the disease. Another 84 million Americans have prediabetes (higher than normal blood glucose levels), and 9 out of 10 of these patients don’t know it. 

March 24th is American Diabetes Association Alert Day. We encourage all patients to take a few minutes and learn about your risk for diabetes. Start with a simple test that takes less than one minute to complete.

Prevention

Factors that increase your risk of diabetes:

  • Family history of diabetes
  • Being male
  • Obesity
  • Smoking
  • High blood pressure
  • High cholesterol
  • Excessive alcohol consumption
  • Physically Inactive
  • Poor sleep habits

By making changes in your lifestyle you can reduce your risk factors. Small adjustments can produce big results. Drinking seltzer instead of soda, adding 30 minutes of brisk activity to your daily routine, developing a “wind-down” routine before bedtime, and other little steps can lower your risk of developing diabetes in a big way.

Discuss your concerns about diabetes with our podiatrists, Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. and Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. Tingling in your feet and wounds on your legs and feet that are slow to heal can be symptoms of diabetes. If you notice these or any other unusual changes in your feet, contact any of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices as soon as possible.

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
November 06, 2019
Category: diabetic foot care

At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, we know that patients who have diabetes are open to a slew of podiatric problems. Neuropathy, or nerve damage, is a common condition associated with diabetes which can decrease your ability to sense pain, burning or other signs of foot injuries and disorders. Sweat secretion and normal oil production can also be impaired, leaving the skin on your feet very dry and resulting in abnormal pressure on bones and joints. Wounds and ulcers are more likely to form and decreased the functioning of the immune system, also common in diabetic patients, which means that it is harder to heal and the chances of infection and even amputation are increased.

Fortunately, there are ways for patients to reduce their risk of diabetic complications. These include:

  • Schedule regular checkups with our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. every six months. Teaming up with your podiatrist to help manage the effects of diabetes on your feet can significantly reduce your risk of hospitalization and amputation. 
  • Practice good daily hygiene. Wash your feet with warm (not hot) water and soap every day. Dry completely—especially between your toes because that’s where athlete’s foot often first develops. Use a foot powder in the morning on your feet and a rich moisturizer at night.
  • Choose footwear wisely. Socks should have no seams, be thick and absorbent and made of a material that wicks moisture away from your skin. Shoes and boots should have roomy toe boxes, low heels and a cushioned insole for maximum protection. Periodically run your hand around the inside of your shoes to check for loose stitching or rough patches that may cause blisters.
  • Get in the habit of inspecting your feet daily. Look for cuts, blisters, bruises, swelling, redness, rashes, growths or lumps. Run the eraser end of a pencil over the entire foot to see if you detect any decrease in sensation in any part of your foot. Make an appointment at one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices to get any concerning symptoms evaluated promptly.
By contactus@ctfootcare.com
June 04, 2019
Category: diabetic foot care

At Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC we encourage all of our patients to be proactive in the health of their feet. Patients with diabetes, however, have to be even more diligent in the care of their feet. Diabetes delivers a double whammy when it comes to podiatric health. First, many patients with this disease experience problems with circulation. This means injuries and infections can be very difficult to heal. Second, neuropathy or lack of sensation in the feet is also common in diabetic patients, making it challenging to detect injuries and symptoms of disorders promptly. 

Below are some recommendations for foot care for diabetic patients:

  • Get in the habit of inspecting your feet regularly, or ask someone else to do for you if you cannot easily see your entire foot. Look for changes in shape, size, skin color, toenail condition, bruises, cuts, rashes, lumps or swelling. Report anything unusual to our podiatrists Jeffrey S. Kahn, D.P.M., Craig M. Kaufman, D.P.M., Ayman M. Latif, D.P.M. or Raffaella R. Pascarella, D.P.M. promptly.
  • Take special care when choosing your footwear. Be sure shoes have a roomy toe box and are made of soft, flexible material. Keep heels lower than two inches. Periodically run your hand around the inside of your shoes to check for loose stitching or rough spots that may rub on your skin.
  • Keep feet dry. Always towel dry your feet completely after washing, especially between your toes. That’s where athlete’s foot often starts. If you sweat excessively, use an anti-fungal powder each morning. Change your socks during the day if you notice they are damp. This will greatly reduce the risk of fungal infections.
  • Avoid going barefoot. This will help prevent cuts and puncture wounds. It will also lessen the chances of getting a foot infection or warts, as these are spread by direct contact.
  • Do not attempt to remove corns or calluses on your own. This can lead to an injury that could become infected. If you need help properly trimming your nails, ask the podiatrist.

Even seemingly minor foot problems can become major threats to your health if you have diabetes. Take the proper precautions to prevent foot and ankle issues. If you have questions about how to care for your diabetic feet, contact one of our six Hartford and Middlesex County offices.

By Connecticut Foot Care Centers, LLC
November 20, 2018
Category: diabetic foot care
Tags: Untagged

Diabetes is a debilitating disease that causes a whole range of short-term and long-term effects on anyone who is dealing with it. Since November is National Diabetes Month, we here at Connecticut Foot Care Centers are taking time to discuss the disease with our patients as much as possible. If you’re one of the 29 million people in America who are dealing with diabetes daily, you know the effects are many and varied.

Short-term effects of diabetes

There are several things that happen to individuals with diabetes when their bodies’ blood sugar levels are outside of normal range. Here are a few:

  • Lack of energy
  • Blurred vision
  • Excessive thirst
  • Excessive hunger
  • Increased need to urinate
  • Feeling lethargic
  • Weakness
  • Shaking
  • Nervousness
  • Sense of confusion

Long-term effects of diabetes

If you’ve been suffering from diabetes for many years, your risk for the long-term effects or complications are increased. Those effects include:

  • Kidney disease
  • Retina damage
  • Blindness
  • Heart disease
  • Stroke
  • Blood vessel damage 
  • Nerve damage

How diabetes affects your feet

Nerve damage, or neuropathy, and blood vessel damage, or peripheral arterial disease, are two common long-term effects that concern podiatrists the most. Nerve damage can rapidly lead to numbness, which can make it tough for a diabetic patient to detect a foot injury or laceration. If you do suffer a scratch, cut, or abrasion to your foot as a diabetic with blood vessel damage, then the wound will heal much more slowly than it would in a non-diabetic foot. Wounds that do not heal can rapidly progress to becoming infected. In worst-case-scenarios, an infection in the foot of a patient with diabetes will result in amputation of a toe, foot, or even the entire lower leg.

If you have diabetes, the good news is that those who take concrete steps to improve their health and blood sugar levels can delay these long-term effects. If you have diabetes and have not had a podiatric checkup in a while, call us today. Our team of foot doctors here at Connecticut Foot Care Centers is equipped with a wealth of knowledge and resources in caring for diabetic feet. We provide the best in foot and ankle care and utilize the newest diagnostic and treatment techniques and technologies! Our friendly and knowledgeable staff has unparalleled experience and can help you at any of our six conveniently located Connecticut offices. Request an appointment today!

By contactus@ctfootcare.com
November 13, 2018
Category: diabetic foot care
Tags: Untagged

Diabetes affects millions of Americans each year, causing issues with their bodies all the way down to their feet. November is National Diabetes Month. If you have diabetes, you know how tough it can be to balance nutrition, weight, and exercise along with all the potential health issues you’re on the lookout for. One of the main issues to keep up on is foot health care. We know how much of a balancing act that can be here at Connecticut Foot Care Centers! That’s why we’ve put together a handy list of what to look for and how to properly care for your feet to take the guesswork out.

Follow these four tips for diabetic foot care

  1. Keep up with podiatry checkups. Your podiatrist is medically trained to care for your feet and ankles, including training to work with patients with diabetes. Regular visits to your podiatrist are a must for diabetic patients to adequately monitor your feet and note any changes in your health. These visits could make the difference in having to amputate a limb.
  2. Do daily foot checks. Sometimes you forget to check in with your feet when you’re busy. Pencil in time every day to look at your feet thoroughly. Make sure you have no ulcers, wounds, or cuts that are headed towards infections. Those can be detrimental to diabetic feet.
  3. Choose the right footwear. Shoes that fit improperly can rub and cause blisters. Due to nerve issues associated with diabetes, a blister that is left untreated could lead to a wound that could potentially become infected. It’s important to wear comfortable shoes that fit right.
  4. Trim your nails correctly. Always make sure to cut your toenails straight across and not too close. This will help to prevent ingrown toenails that can grow into a nasty infection.

If you are a patient with diabetes who has not had a podiatric checkup in a while, call us today. Our team of foot doctors here at Connecticut Foot Care Centers is equipped with a wealth of knowledge and resources in caring for diabetic feet. We provide the best in foot and ankle care and utilize the newest diagnostic and treatment techniques and technologies! Our friendly and knowledgeable staff has unparalleled experience and can help you at any of our six conveniently located Connecticut offices. Request an appointment today!